Reply by jim January 18, 20052005-01-18

Jerry Avins wrote:

> > I never leave the key in the ignition unless I use my spare key to lock > the doors. I do that only when warming the car, usually in my driveway. > In that car, a middle-50s Dodge, there was no mechanism to capture the > key in the lock or to lock the steering wheel when the key was removed. >
That was one of those push button transmission. I'm pretty sure by the 50's automatics were required by federal afety regulations to have a positve stop (parking pawl) when the car was off and the key removed. I don't remember how that was implemented with those push button transmissions. -jim ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Reply by Jerry Avins January 18, 20052005-01-18
jim wrote:

> > Jerry Avins wrote: > >>jim wrote: >> >> >>>Jerry Avins wrote: >> >>>> The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I >>>>concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump >>>>around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had >>>>left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. >>>> >>> >>>And that would be why the car wouldn't start..No? >>> >>>-jim >> >>Exactly. That was my point. What did you think it was? > > > Well, your stated point was "Interlocks have their place." But the story > seems to contradict that, since you were unaware of any interlock. The > moral of the story as far as I can see is that you should not leave the > key in the ignition when stopping and leaving the car. At least that > would be the automakers defense had you come to harm. > > -jim > > > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups > ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
I never leave the key in the ignition unless I use my spare key to lock the doors. I do that only when warming the car, usually in my driveway. In that car, a middle-50s Dodge, there was no mechanism to capture the key in the lock or to lock the steering wheel when the key was removed. Too many interlocks can be a detriment. Cars nowadays have an interlock override to allow the transmission to get out of park without the key. A guy I knew of washed out of flight school when he landed his trainer without putting the wheels down. There was a warning horn that sounded in the headset if the flaps were put down while the wheels were up. His flight instructor was livid: "Didn't you hear us yelling at you to put the wheels down?" His answer: "I couldn't hear _anything_ with that damn horn in my ears!" Interlocks need to be well thought out. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������
Reply by jim January 18, 20052005-01-18

Jerry Avins wrote:
> > jim wrote: > > > > > Jerry Avins wrote: > > >> The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I > >>concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump > >>around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had > >>left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. > >> > > > > And that would be why the car wouldn't start..No? > > > > -jim > > Exactly. That was my point. What did you think it was?
Well, your stated point was "Interlocks have their place." But the story seems to contradict that, since you were unaware of any interlock. The moral of the story as far as I can see is that you should not leave the key in the ignition when stopping and leaving the car. At least that would be the automakers defense had you come to harm. -jim ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Reply by Jerry Avins January 18, 20052005-01-18
jim wrote:

> > Jerry Avins wrote:
>> The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I >>concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump >>around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had >>left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. >> > > And that would be why the car wouldn't start..No? > > -jim
Exactly. That was my point. What did you think it was? Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������
Reply by jim January 18, 20052005-01-18

Jerry Avins wrote:
 The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I
> concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump > around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had > left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. >
And that would be why the car wouldn't start..No? -jim
> Fortunately, on idle gas in deep snow, it didn't get away from me, and I > jumped in and hit the brake. Then I put the hood down so I could see and > drove home. That was about 40 years ago, and this is my first admission. > > Jerry > -- > Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. > �����������������������������������������������������������������������
----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Reply by Jon Harris January 17, 20052005-01-17
"Jerry Avins" <jya@ieee.org> wrote in message
news:352qkrF4gh5nvU1@individual.net...
> Shawn Steenhagen wrote: > > Interlocks have their place. I remember one snowy morning right after I > got my first automatic-transmission car, an old clunker. I was nearly > alone in the parking lot when I went to the pharmacy for medicines for > half the kids on the block. When I got back to the car, it wouldn't > start: not even a click. The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I > concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump > around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had > left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. > > Fortunately, on idle gas in deep snow, it didn't get away from me, and I > jumped in and hit the brake. Then I put the hood down so I could see and > drove home. That was about 40 years ago, and this is my first admission.
Feels good to finally come clean, doesn't it? :-) This same interlock causes me problems in my automatic transmission car. It works intermittently such that sometimes the car won't start even when it is in Park. Usually, jiggling the shift lever fixes the problem. But lately it seems to be happening more frequently, moving from a mere occasional annoyance to something I will probably want to get fixed. I've also tried starting an automatic not in park and spent some time scratching my head trying to figure out why nothing was happening. But fortunately I'm not handy enough to try "fixing" the problem like Jerry did, so I eventually figured it out. :-)
Reply by Jerry Avins January 17, 20052005-01-17
Shawn Steenhagen wrote:

  ...

> Simone, > > I would guess one of two things are happening. Either (a) there is a reload > register that you must also change or (b) the code generated by the bios > tool (perhaps in the interrupt service) is reloading the register (perhaps > with a hard coded value) based on the settings from the configuration tool. > > With a little documentation search or code search you should be able to > figure out which is happening. If its (b) you'll need to modify the ISR, > create a variable to write to the register and then you can write to that > variable via the USB. > > -Shawn
OUCH! Leave the system timer alone! It's so important that it has a built-in self-repair mechanism. If you're clever, you can probably defeat that and crash the system. I don't like RTOSs because it usually takes me more sweat to psych them out than to write the functions I need in ways that I understand. I'm sure they're a great boon to those not so thick-headed as I tend to be. Interlocks have their place. I remember one snowy morning right after I got my first automatic-transmission car, an old clunker. I was nearly alone in the parking lot when I went to the pharmacy for medicines for half the kids on the block. When I got back to the car, it wouldn't start: not even a click. The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. Fortunately, on idle gas in deep snow, it didn't get away from me, and I jumped in and hit the brake. Then I put the hood down so I could see and drove home. That was about 40 years ago, and this is my first admission. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Reply by Simone Winkler January 17, 20052005-01-17
Thank you, that helped me out!! :)

Simone 


Reply by Shawn Steenhagen January 17, 20052005-01-17
"Simone Winkler" <simone.winkler@gmx.at> wrote in message
news:41e8eccd$1@e-post.inode.at...
> Hello, > > i've got a problem: > I'm programming the TI C6713 DSP together with DSP/BIOS. What I want to do > is to get a programmable timer: I send the timer value via USB to the DSP > and then I want to set the timer to this specific value. > It seems to me, that in the DSP-BIOS you can only set a fixed value for
the
> CLK manager (value in microseconds or directly configure the PRD
register).
> So I tried to write the PRD register directly inside my source code (with
a
> pointer to the address of the PRD0 register). > That seems to work (I can watch the core registers and it is written > successfully), but afterwards, the value of the register is reset to the > fixed value inside the DSP-BIOS configuration. > What can I do?? > > Please help me! > > Thank you, > Simone Winkler > >
Simone, I would guess one of two things are happening. Either (a) there is a reload register that you must also change or (b) the code generated by the bios tool (perhaps in the interrupt service) is reloading the register (perhaps with a hard coded value) based on the settings from the configuration tool. With a little documentation search or code search you should be able to figure out which is happening. If its (b) you'll need to modify the ISR, create a variable to write to the register and then you can write to that variable via the USB. -Shawn
Reply by Brad Griffis January 16, 20052005-01-16
Simone,

I think you misunderstood what I was saying.  What I was suggesting you do 
was to just leave Timer 0 alone so that DSP/BIOS can function properly.  You 
should allow DSP/BIOS to use Timer 0 and then you can use Timer 1 for 
whatever variable-time interrupts you're trying to generate.  There is a CSL 
section called TIMER that you could use to do this.

Brad

"Simone Winkler" <simone.winkler@gmx.at> wrote in message 
news:41ea9a12$1@e-post.inode.at...
> Hi, > thank you very much for your answer. > >> Use Timer 1 if you need some kind of variable length timer. >> > > I tried to - I simply opened my cdb-file and in the properties of > CLK_Manager I set Timer0 to Timer1. But that doesn't help! Again, I tried > to set the PRD1 register manually. It worked, but when it accessed the > function that the timer was assigned to, the value of the PRD1 register > was reset to the value that I initially wrote into the cdb-file. > > What can I do? > > I tried to completely delete the CLK object, but then I need a pointer to > the Interrupt service routine (the function that should be accessed, when > a timer interrupt occurs) which doesn't seem to be so easy. (I read about > Timer handles, but I doubt if it is easier to accomplish?) > > Thank you! > > Simone > >