Reply by Randy Yates August 8, 20052005-08-08
Jerry Avins <jya@ieee.org> writes:

> Gordon Sande wrote: > > ... > >> There are also Maxwell's relations which are fundamental in >> thermodynamics. The story has it that an eminent physicist, active >> in thermodynamics, once did a review of Maxwell's work which included >> a line that "Maxwell also did some work in electromagnetism". > > The reviewer of Fred Astaire's Hollywood screen test opined that > Astaire would be passable and added, "and he can dance a bit, too."
I just watched him with Judy Garland in "Easter Parade" yesterday. I never really knew what "dancing like Fred Astaire" meant until I saw that movie. (And the costumes!!! ...) -- % Randy Yates % "Bird, on the wing, %% Fuquay-Varina, NC % goes floating by %%% 919-577-9882 % but there's a teardrop in his eye..." %%%% <yates@ieee.org> % 'One Summer Dream', *Face The Music*, ELO http://home.earthlink.net/~yatescr
Reply by Jerry Avins August 8, 20052005-08-08
Gordon Sande wrote:

   ...

> There are also Maxwell's relations which are fundamental in > thermodynamics. The story has it that an eminent physicist, active > in thermodynamics, once did a review of Maxwell's work which included > a line that "Maxwell also did some work in electromagnetism".
The reviewer of Fred Astaire's Hollywood screen test opined that Astaire would be passable and added, "and he can dance a bit, too." Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Reply by Gordon Sande August 8, 20052005-08-08

Jerry Avins wrote:
> Rick Lyons wrote: > >> On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 13:19:42 GMT, Gordon Sande >> <g.sande@worldnet.att.net> wrote: >> >> >>> >>> Clay S. Turner wrote: >>> >>>> <eunometic@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message >>>> news:1122873344.917693.210890@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com... >>>> >>>> >>>>> Hilbert Transforms were ofcourse developed by Hilbert and the Dirac >>>>> delta by Dirac. >>>> >>>> >>>> >>>> The "delta function" came before Dirac, but it was little known. He >>>> popularized the concept and showed how useful it can be to >>>> applications in quantum mechanics. >>>> >> >> >> Hi, >> >> I read somewhere that when Maxwell died, there were twenty >> "Maxwell's equations", and that it was Oliver Heaviside who reduced >> those down to the current-day four equations.
>>
>> See Ya', >> [-Rick-] > > > Maxwell's equations were originally four _sets_ of integral equations, > one in each set for one axis in space, for a total of 12. He also > expresses the relations in quaternions and vector analysis (curl and all > that). Dover has an unabridged two-volume set of "A Treatise on > Electricity and Magnetism". I bought mine long ago. The set was $4. > Reading it gives one much respect for the ancients.
There are also Maxwell's relations which are fundamental in thermodynamics. The story has it that an eminent physicist, active in thermodynamics, once did a review of Maxwell's work which included a line that "Maxwell also did some work in electromagnetism".
> Jerry
Reply by Jerry Avins August 6, 20052005-08-06
Rick Lyons wrote:
> On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 13:19:42 GMT, Gordon Sande > <g.sande@worldnet.att.net> wrote: > > >> >>Clay S. Turner wrote: >> >>><eunometic@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message >>>news:1122873344.917693.210890@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com... >>> >>> >>>>Hilbert Transforms were ofcourse developed by Hilbert and the Dirac >>>>delta by Dirac. >>> >>> >>>The "delta function" came before Dirac, but it was little known. He >>>popularized the concept and showed how useful it can be to applications in >>>quantum mechanics. >>> > > > Hi, > > I read somewhere that when Maxwell died, there were > twenty "Maxwell's equations", and that it > was Oliver Heaviside who reduced those down > to the current-day four equations. > > See Ya', > [-Rick-]
Maxwell's equations were originally four _sets_ of integral equations, one in each set for one axis in space, for a total of 12. He also expresses the relations in quaternions and vector analysis (curl and all that). Dover has an unabridged two-volume set of "A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism". I bought mine long ago. The set was $4. Reading it gives one much respect for the ancients. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Reply by Rick Lyons August 6, 20052005-08-06
On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 13:19:42 GMT, Gordon Sande
<g.sande@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

> > >Clay S. Turner wrote: >> <eunometic@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message >> news:1122873344.917693.210890@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com... >> >>>Hilbert Transforms were ofcourse developed by Hilbert and the Dirac >>>delta by Dirac. >> >> >> The "delta function" came before Dirac, but it was little known. He >> popularized the concept and showed how useful it can be to applications in >> quantum mechanics. >>
Hi, I read somewhere that when Maxwell died, there were twenty "Maxwell's equations", and that it was Oliver Heaviside who reduced those down to the current-day four equations. See Ya', [-Rick-]
Reply by Everett M. Greene August 2, 20052005-08-02
"bhooshaniyer" <bhooshaniyer@gmail.com> writes:
> ... > > > which is basically the principle of least action > > applied to a Lagrangian proportional to the Ricci > > curvature scalar. > > To just read that felt surreal!
What's the problem? What he said is intuitively obvious to the least informed! :-)
Reply by Robert E. Beaudoin August 2, 20052005-08-02
Clay wrote:
> Hello Robert, > > Thanks for the response. My interpretation of the OP's statement was > Hilbert beat Einstein to the result and then Einstein stole all of the > glory. Hilbert's approach is certainly notewothy since least action > principles abound in physics and alternative mathematical methods often > prove to be illuminating on their own[1]. However I suspect Hilbert was > familiar with Einstein's result and therefore not only had the problem > but also had the solution. This is quite different than working out a > solution where the destination is unknown. But even if Hilbert found > this solution without knowing the field equation (a great feat the > principle of equivalence is bypassed yielding a theory without an > obvious physical basis (The few references I've found so far give > little to no detail). I don't have Wheeler handy. Einstein's approach > is rooted in a physical basis. And today most who study his work > celebrate his acheivements. > > Clay > > [1] Hamilton's modification to the LaGrangian method of classical > mechanics turns out to be the usual approach in quantum mechanics. >
Hi Clay, Just in case it wasn't clear: I agree with you on all of this. Bob Beaudoin
Reply by Clay August 2, 20052005-08-02
Hello Robert,

Thanks for the response. My interpretation of the OP's statement was
Hilbert beat Einstein to the result and then Einstein stole all of the
glory. Hilbert's approach is certainly notewothy since least action
principles abound in physics and alternative mathematical methods often
prove to be illuminating on their own[1]. However I suspect Hilbert was
familiar with Einstein's result and therefore not only had the problem
but also had the solution. This is quite different than working out a
solution where the destination is unknown.  But even if Hilbert found
this solution without knowing the field equation (a great feat the
principle of equivalence is bypassed yielding a theory without an
obvious physical basis (The few references I've found so far give
little to no detail). I don't have Wheeler handy. Einstein's approach
is rooted in a physical basis. And today most who study his work
celebrate his acheivements.

Clay

[1] Hamilton's modification to the LaGrangian method of classical
mechanics turns out to be the usual approach in quantum mechanics.

Reply by glen herrmannsfeldt August 2, 20052005-08-02
Robert E. Beaudoin wrote:

(snip)

> I suppose the OP was referring to Hilbert's action principle (for > gravitation as a consequence of space-time curvature). According > to Misner, Thorne, and Wheeler (see section 21.2 of their book > _Gravitation_)
I haven't seen a copy for many years. The story I used to hear was that only three people really understood the book. -- glen
Reply by bhooshaniyer August 2, 20052005-08-02
..

> which is basically the principle of least action > applied to a Lagrangian proportional to the Ricci > curvature scalar.
To just read that felt surreal! --Bhooshan This message was sent using the Comp.DSP web interface on www.DSPRelated.com