Reply by pome...@hotmail.com August 29, 20062006-08-29
Tim Wescott wrote:
> Jerry Avins wrote: > > > Tim Wescott wrote: > > > > > >> ... Fermi exclusion principal, ... > > > > > > Errm, Pauli? > > > > Jerry > > Dangit! I'm to young to be senile! > > Fermi, Pauli, Martini -- what's the difference. > > Although I don't know if I'd want to be in a bar that had a Martini > exclusion principal in effect.
No doubles?
Reply by Hans-Bernhard Broeker August 29, 20062006-08-29
In comp.arch.embedded Tim Wescott <tim@seemywebsite.com> wrote:

> Fermi, Pauli, Martini -- what's the difference.
Easy: two can be counted on to ruin any physical experiment conducted in their presence, whereas the remaining one would be a major asset to have around. -- Hans-Bernhard Broeker (broeker@physik.rwth-aachen.de) Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.
Reply by John Woodgate August 29, 20062006-08-29
In message <8Z-dnbRwjrj95mnZnZ2dnUVZ_u2dnZ2d@web-ster.com>, dated Tue, 
29 Aug 2006, Tim Wescott <tim@seemywebsite.com> writes
>Jerry Avins wrote: > >> Tim Wescott wrote: >> >>> ... Fermi exclusion principal, ... >> Errm, Pauli? >> Jerry > >Dangit! I'm to young to be senile!
Three ages of Man; infantile, penile, senile. (;-)
> >Fermi, Pauli, Martini -- what's the difference.
Have you ever TASTED a dry Fermi?
> >Although I don't know if I'd want to be in a bar that had a Martini >exclusion principal in effect.
Don't worry; it simply states that only ten Martinis can occupy the same stomach unless it is parallel to the floor. -- OOO - Own Opinions Only. Try www.jmwa.demon.co.uk and www.isce.org.uk 2006 is YMMVI- Your mileage may vary immensely. John Woodgate, J M Woodgate and Associates, Rayleigh, Essex UK
Reply by Tim Wescott August 29, 20062006-08-29
Jerry Avins wrote:

> Tim Wescott wrote: > > >> ... Fermi exclusion principal, ... > > > Errm, Pauli? > > Jerry
Dangit! I'm to young to be senile! Fermi, Pauli, Martini -- what's the difference. Although I don't know if I'd want to be in a bar that had a Martini exclusion principal in effect. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com Posting from Google? See http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/ "Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" came out in April. See details at http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html
Reply by Jerry Avins August 29, 20062006-08-29
Tim Wescott wrote:


> ... Fermi exclusion principal, ...
Errm, Pauli? Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Reply by John Woodgate August 29, 20062006-08-29
In message <u7OdnTEAMeym7WnZnZ2dnUVZ_omdnZ2d@web-ster.com>, dated Tue, 
29 Aug 2006, Tim Wescott <tim@seemywebsite.com> writes

>Fermions, and the Fermi exclusion principal, which you validate every >time you fail to sink through the floor.
Yes, the FEP makes things firm. (;-) -- OOO - Own Opinions Only. Try www.jmwa.demon.co.uk and www.isce.org.uk 2006 is YMMVI- Your mileage may vary immensely. John Woodgate, J M Woodgate and Associates, Rayleigh, Essex UK
Reply by Tim Wescott August 29, 20062006-08-29
glen herrmannsfeldt wrote:

> robert bristow-johnson wrote: > > (snip) > >> he doesn't get the theorem exclusively (Shannon's name gets attached), >> but he gets the "Nyquist frequency". wouldn't it be tits to have the >> "Herrmannsfeldt impedance" ubiquitous in the lit? > > > There is a story that L'Hopital's rule was formulated by Bernoulli, > but L'Hopital bought all Bernoulli's ideas for some period of time, > including that one. > > So there is another way to get your name on a rule or law. > > Fermi seems to have done pretty well, though. An element Fermium, > distance unit (also called the femtometer, conveniently with the same > abbreviation), Fermi energy, Fermi momentum, Fermi velocity, and > probably more that I can't think of right now. > > -- glen >
Fermions, and the Fermi exclusion principal, which you validate every time you fail to sink through the floor. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com Posting from Google? See http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/ "Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" came out in April. See details at http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html
Reply by glen herrmannsfeldt August 29, 20062006-08-29
John Woodgate wrote:

> In message <h8mdnaihcIJRVm7ZnZ2dnUVZ_tWdnZ2d@comcast.com>, dated Mon, 28 > Aug 2006, glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu> writes
>> Fermi seems to have done pretty well, though. An element Fermium, >> distance unit (also called the femtometer, conveniently with the same >> abbreviation),
> The metric prefix femto- (10^-15) is named after the Danish word > 'femten' - fifteen, not FeRmi
Yes, but the unit of length approximately the diameter of the nucleus was named after Fermi, and is abbreviated to fm. That happens to be 1e-15m. Someone was lucky. -- glen
Reply by John Woodgate August 29, 20062006-08-29
In message <h8mdnaihcIJRVm7ZnZ2dnUVZ_tWdnZ2d@comcast.com>, dated Mon, 28 
Aug 2006, glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu> writes

>Fermi seems to have done pretty well, though. An element Fermium, >distance unit (also called the femtometer, conveniently with the same >abbreviation),
The metric prefix femto- (10^-15) is named after the Danish word 'femten' - fifteen, not FeRmi -- OOO - Own Opinions Only. Try www.jmwa.demon.co.uk and www.isce.org.uk 2006 is YMMVI- Your mileage may vary immensely. John Woodgate, J M Woodgate and Associates, Rayleigh, Essex UK
Reply by glen herrmannsfeldt August 29, 20062006-08-29
robert bristow-johnson wrote:

(snip)

> he doesn't get the theorem exclusively (Shannon's name gets attached), > but he gets the "Nyquist frequency". wouldn't it be tits to have the > "Herrmannsfeldt impedance" ubiquitous in the lit?
There is a story that L'Hopital's rule was formulated by Bernoulli, but L'Hopital bought all Bernoulli's ideas for some period of time, including that one. So there is another way to get your name on a rule or law. Fermi seems to have done pretty well, though. An element Fermium, distance unit (also called the femtometer, conveniently with the same abbreviation), Fermi energy, Fermi momentum, Fermi velocity, and probably more that I can't think of right now. -- glen