Reply by John Herman March 30, 20072007-03-30
I googled for that and got 71,100 hits.  The first one might even work for 
you.

"widrow lms adaptive filter"

In article <euilqo$smj$1@nemesis.news.tpi.pl>, Bergen <nie@ma.takiego.numeru> 
wrote:
>Anybody knows where to find LMS filter code written in C/C++ ??? >I need it to implement it on old ADSP 21061 to finish my diploma and get >outta school (freedom !!!). >Google don't know what's all about. Please, help !!! >
Reply by Bergen March 30, 20072007-03-30
Vladimir Vassilevsky wrote:

> Enjoy: > > X_expected = 0; > > for(i = 0; i < length; i++) X_expected += k[i]*x[i]; > > E = (X - X_expected)*Beta; > > for(i = 0; i < length; i++) k[i] += E*k[i]; >
You got to be kidding...
> God help you, my boy. Is it a new style education that a graduate can't > put three lines of code together?
We got such proverb here: When I realise what engineer am I, I'm afraid to go to doctor. Anyway, in serious, do you know that story about Egg of Columbus ? -- Greetings, Bergen
Reply by Tim Wescott March 30, 20072007-03-30
Bergen wrote:
> Tim Wescott napisa&#2013266099;(a): > >> >> If I recall correctly, Clark's "Equalizers for Digital Modems" has >> block diagrams for various LMS filtering schemes -- these should be >> fairly easy to translate. >> >> You may also want to get on the ARRL website -- I know they had some >> very interesting articles on LMS adaptive filters back in the late >> '80s. Not with code, but with quite detailed block diagrams. > > Thanks, I will check all that. I didn't realize that HAM's websites can > contain such interesting stuff. >
You'll probably have to find the article on the web site, chase down the appropriate issue of QST or QRX to get the actual article. Many, if not most, serious RF engineers have one or two copies of the ARRL Handbook in their cubes, and keep tabs on ARRL publications. What you learn about communications systems in school is exceptionally useful if you hold your mouth right, but it's also exceptionally esoteric. The ARRL stuff is very useful for reducing the esoteric to practice. Many of the amateur radio operators who are actively developing systems are "amateur" in the same sense that Olympic athletes are "amateur" -- they're really good at it, they may even make $$$ at it as their day job, and they do some more on the side for fun. Some (but not all) of the material from the ARRL reflects this. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com Posting from Google? See http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/ Do you need to implement control loops in software? "Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" gives you just what it says. See details at http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html
Reply by Vladimir Vassilevsky March 30, 20072007-03-30

Bergen wrote:

> Anybody knows where to find LMS filter code written in C/C++ ???
Enjoy: X_expected = 0; for(i = 0; i < length; i++) X_expected += k[i]*x[i]; E = (X - X_expected)*Beta; for(i = 0; i < length; i++) k[i] += E*k[i];
> I need it to implement it on old ADSP 21061 to finish my diploma and get outta school (freedom !!!). > Google don't know what's all about. Please, help !!!
God help you, my boy. Is it a new style education that a graduate can't put three lines of code together? Vladimir Vassilevsky DSP and Mixed Signal Design Consultant http://www.abvolt.com
Reply by Bergen March 30, 20072007-03-30
julius napisa?(a):


> OK, I didn't want to get involved in this, but earlier > you said: > " I need it to implement it on old ADSP 21061 to > finish my diploma and get outta school > (freedom !!!). " > How does this statement agree with "My diploma is done"?
My fault. My diploma is about some software stuff for SHARC testing. Now I need to make SHARC working in different ways to prove that what I done is working as I want to.
> On a related subject, what you are asking for is a > commercially-valuable product that is usually bought > and sold. That may explain why you can't find a > free code for it.
I didn't know that. Yesterday I just simply downloaded a FIR's code in C, it works fine, so I assumed that I can do the same with LMS. If I don't make a LMS, it will be ok, but if I can, why don't ? -- Bergen
Reply by julius March 30, 20072007-03-30
On Mar 30, 11:02 am, Bergen <n...@ma.takiego.numeru> wrote:

> Oh, that was very helpful, thanks :/ > You know what they say about proving the obvious ? > My diploma is done, but I need to test my work with LMS
OK, I didn't want to get involved in this, but earlier you said: " I need it to implement it on old ADSP 21061 to finish my diploma and get outta school (freedom !!!). " How does this statement agree with "My diploma is done"? On a related subject, what you are asking for is a commercially-valuable product that is usually bought and sold. That may explain why you can't find a free code for it. Julius
Reply by Bergen March 30, 20072007-03-30
Tim Wescott napisa&#2013266099;(a):

> > If I recall correctly, Clark's "Equalizers for Digital Modems" has block > diagrams for various LMS filtering schemes -- these should be fairly > easy to translate. > > You may also want to get on the ARRL website -- I know they had some > very interesting articles on LMS adaptive filters back in the late '80s. > Not with code, but with quite detailed block diagrams.
Thanks, I will check all that. I didn't realize that HAM's websites can contain such interesting stuff. -- Bergen, SQ2GN
Reply by Tim Wescott March 30, 20072007-03-30
Bergen wrote:
> Anybody knows where to find LMS filter code written in C/C++ ??? > I need it to implement it on old ADSP 21061 to finish my diploma and get > outta school (freedom !!!). > Google don't know what's all about. Please, help !!! >
Did you search on "least mean square" or just "LMS"? Searching on "adaptive filter" may also help -- I believe that most of that uses the LMS algorithm at it's core, for computational ease if nothing else. One would expect it to be splattered all over. If I recall correctly, Clark's "Equalizers for Digital Modems" has block diagrams for various LMS filtering schemes -- these should be fairly easy to translate. You may also want to get on the ARRL website -- I know they had some very interesting articles on LMS adaptive filters back in the late '80s. Not with code, but with quite detailed block diagrams. In my experience, starting with a block diagram that I understand and writing code from it can take me less time than debugging code that I've harvested off of the net. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com Posting from Google? See http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/ Do you need to implement control loops in software? "Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" gives you just what it says. See details at http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html
Reply by Bergen March 30, 20072007-03-30
Freelance Embedded Systems Engineer napisa&#2013266099;(a):

> > If you're suppose to do it to finish your diploma, then you should do it > yourself and learn something in the process. >
Oh, that was very helpful, thanks :/ You know what they say about proving the obvious ? My diploma is done, but I need to test my work with LMS filter running on EZ-Lite kit by AD. I need to pay for any month of delay, so it will be great to finish all this, defend my diploma (or pass final exam, whatever it's called in your country) to prove I learnt something in all these processes ;) and start to make something interesting. I am not looking for a finished solution. I'm asking where I can find any help - right now I feel that no one tried to do LMS in C before. -- Bergen
Reply by Freelance Embedded Systems Engineer March 30, 20072007-03-30
Bergen wrote:
> Anybody knows where to find LMS filter code written in C/C++ ??? > I need it to implement it on old ADSP 21061 to finish my diploma and get > outta school (freedom !!!). > Google don't know what's all about. Please, help !!!
If you're suppose to do it to finish your diploma, then you should do it yourself and learn something in the process.