Reply by karthikbalaguru March 8, 20082008-03-08
On Feb 26, 6:28�pm, c...@claysturner.com wrote:
> On Feb 25, 8:18&#2013266080;pm, "maxplanck" <erik.bo...@comcast.net> wrote: > > > TheHilberttransformof a sine wave is an inverted cos wave, right? > > You will find all of the details here: > > http://www.claysturner.com/dsp/HilbertTransforms.pdf >
Nice link :):) Karthik Balaguru
Reply by maxplanck February 27, 20082008-02-27
So, the hilbert transform of a sin wave IS an inverted cos wave

Thanks!

>On Feb 26, 1:07=A0pm, "maxplanck" <erik.bo...@comcast.net> wrote: >> Please can someone just tell me what the hilbert transform of a sine
wave
>> is? > >It is on the first page of the document I gave you a link to. > >Clay > >
Reply by February 26, 20082008-02-26
On Feb 26, 1:07&#2013266080;pm, "maxplanck" <erik.bo...@comcast.net> wrote:
> Please can someone just tell me what the hilbert transform of a sine wave > is?
It is on the first page of the document I gave you a link to. Clay
Reply by maxplanck February 26, 20082008-02-26
Please can someone just tell me what the hilbert transform of a sine wave
is?
Reply by February 26, 20082008-02-26
On Feb 25, 8:18&#2013266080;pm, "maxplanck" <erik.bo...@comcast.net> wrote:
> The Hilbert transform of a sine wave is an inverted cos wave, right?
You will find all of the details here: http://www.claysturner.com/dsp/HilbertTransforms.pdf IHTH, Clay
Reply by Jerry Avins February 26, 20082008-02-26
Al Clark wrote:
> "maxplanck" <erik.bowen@comcast.net> wrote in > news:2cWdnWMVW8B29V7anZ2dnUVZ_qCunZ2d@giganews.com: > >> The Hilbert transform of a sine wave is an inverted cos wave, right? >> > > No. > > sin(wt) is not the same as -cos(wt).
But Al, a Hilbert transform shifts phase 90 degrees. Depending on implementation, it can be either way. Maxboard wants to know which way. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Reply by Steve Underwood February 25, 20082008-02-25
Al Clark wrote:
> "maxplanck" <erik.bowen@comcast.net> wrote in > news:2cWdnWMVW8B29V7anZ2dnUVZ_qCunZ2d@giganews.com: > >> The Hilbert transform of a sine wave is an inverted cos wave, right? >> > > No. > > sin(wt) is not the same as -cos(wt).
I would hope that is the case. If they were the same, a Hilbert transform would be rather a waste of time, wouldn't it? :-\ Steve
Reply by Al Clark February 25, 20082008-02-25
"maxplanck" <erik.bowen@comcast.net> wrote in 
news:2cWdnWMVW8B29V7anZ2dnUVZ_qCunZ2d@giganews.com:

> The Hilbert transform of a sine wave is an inverted cos wave, right? >
No. sin(wt) is not the same as -cos(wt). Al Clark Danville Signal Processing, Inc.
Reply by maxplanck February 25, 20082008-02-25
The Hilbert transform of a sine wave is an inverted cos wave, right?