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Melodyne and 'Hit n Mix' - How do these products compare to research algorithms

Started by ben March 9, 2011
Hello,

I was wondering if anyone had done any direct comparisons between commercially available products such as Melodyne and Hit n Mix which on paper seem to have cracked pitch extraction and polyphonic recognition and the algorithms presented in research journals/conferences etc.

Has anyone run any testing similar to that used at ISMIR? or produced F-measure scores etc?

I find it interesting that MIR is such an active research area yet commercial products are coming in to the market achieving perceived results which the research community isn't managing as yet. Like i say, this is only perceived as I haven't found any direct comparisons as yet.

Has anyone done any testing or comparisons with these products? Or simply have any comments on the subject of commercially products Vs research algorithms?

I'm interested in your thoughts!
Thanks

Ben.
Ben-

> I was wondering if anyone had done any direct comparisons between commercially available products such as Melodyne and
> Hit n Mix which on paper seem to have cracked pitch extraction and polyphonic recognition and the algorithms presented
> in research journals/conferences etc.
>
> Has anyone run any testing similar to that used at ISMIR? or produced F-measure scores etc?
>
> I find it interesting that MIR is such an active research area yet commercial products are coming in to the market
> achieving perceived results which the research community isn't managing as yet.

That is not surprising. If for-profit companies didn't do substantially better than academic research groups, then we
wouldn't have an economy, there would be no patent system,etc.

Yes they are better -- that's their job. People invest a lot of money in those companies, and the engineers work 80
hrs a week (or more) on it for years. Eventually what they're doing may emerge in the form of published research
papers, company white papers, or other documentation.

-Jeff

> Like i say, this is only perceived as
> I haven't found any direct comparisons as yet.
>
> Has anyone done any testing or comparisons with these products? Or simply have any comments on the subject of
> commercially products Vs research algorithms?
>
> I'm interested in your thoughts!
> Thanks
>
> Ben.