Forums

XMOS XC-1 kits are shipping

Started by Leon October 10, 2008
I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit.

The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications.

I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came
out. David May designed them both, of course.

Leon
leon355@btinternet.com
On Oct 10, 9:01&#2013266080;pm, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote:
> I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. > > The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. > > I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came > out. David May designed them both, of course. > > Leon > leon...@btinternet.com
Is the comparison with the Transputer supposed to imply this is a half thought out design with brain dead execution? :-\ Steve
On 10 oct, 09:01, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote:
> I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. > > The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. > > I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came > out. David May designed them both, of course. > > Leon > leon...@btinternet.com
Don't be surprised if people are skeptical. Remember what happened to the company that made Field-programmable- object arrays?
On 10 Oct, 17:42, ste...@coppice.org wrote:
> On Oct 10, 9:01&#2013266080;pm, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote: > > > I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. > > > The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. > > > I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came > > out. David May designed them both, of course. > > > Leon > > leon...@btinternet.com > > Is the comparison with the Transputer supposed to imply this is a half > thought out design with brain dead execution? :-\ > > Steve
The transputer was ahead of its time, and really pushed the technology that was available. I sold a lot of systems using it, mostly to universities and research establishments, because there was nothing else around with that sort of performance then. Inmos even had their own fab! Leon
On 10 Oct, 18:11, Benjamin Couillard <benjamin.couill...@gmail.com>
wrote:
> On 10 oct, 09:01, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote: > > > I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. > > > The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. > > > I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came > > out. David May designed them both, of course. > > > Leon > > leon...@btinternet.com > > Don't be surprised if people are skeptical. > > Remember what happened to the company that made Field-programmable- > object arrays?
These are processors, not FPGAs. Leon
On 10 oct, 13:44, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote:
> On 10 Oct, 18:11, Benjamin Couillard <benjamin.couill...@gmail.com> > wrote: > > > > > On 10 oct, 09:01, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote: > > > > I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. > > > > The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. > > > > I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came > > > out. David May designed them both, of course. > > > > Leon > > > leon...@btinternet.com > > > Don't be surprised if people are skeptical. > > > Remember what happened to the company that made Field-programmable- > > object arrays? > > These are processors, not FPGAs. > > Leon
On 10 oct, 13:44, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote:
> On 10 Oct, 18:11, Benjamin Couillard <benjamin.couill...@gmail.com> > wrote: > > > > > On 10 oct, 09:01, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote: > > > > I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. > > > > The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. > > > > I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came > > > out. David May designed them both, of course. > > > > Leon > > > leon...@btinternet.com > > > Don't be surprised if people are skeptical. > > > Remember what happened to the company that made Field-programmable- > > object arrays? > > These are processors, not FPGAs. > > Leon
I'm well aware of that, I'm just saying that we shouldn't always believe the hype. I'll believe it when I see it..
Leon wrote:
> I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. > > The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. > > I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came > out. David May designed them both, of course. > > Leon > leon355@btinternet.com
I see the sdk poster lists as one example an "audio synthesizer". I will be interested to hear just how sophisticated (or not) that is. And whether it will ever be reasonable to run streaming FFTs on it. And, what the running temperature is. The transputer had a sort of problem in that if you had a lot of them packed together (viz. the famous early Csound transputer project at Durham university), they sort of melted. Also interesting that they list the keywords "float" and "double" as currently unsupported (which is understandable enough) but also "reserved for future use". Wonder how far ahead they are looking. Richard Dobson
Leon wrote:
> On 10 Oct, 17:42, ste...@coppice.org wrote: >> On Oct 10, 9:01 pm, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote: >> >>> I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. >>> The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. >>> I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came >>> out. David May designed them both, of course. >>> Leon >>> leon...@btinternet.com >> Is the comparison with the Transputer supposed to imply this is a half >> thought out design with brain dead execution? :-\ >> >> Steve > > The transputer was ahead of its time, and really pushed the technology > that was available. I sold a lot of systems using it, mostly to > universities and research establishments, because there was nothing > else around with that sort of performance then. Inmos even had their > own fab! >
I met a guy from the transputer design team down in the Bryce Canyon (here in the US). Unfortunately that company seemed to have lacked marketing savvy just like Plessey and many others. Great products (well, most of them) but that doesn't get you anywhere unless you can nail the next step, the deal. It's probably similar to engineer-driven car manufacturers like Borgward. A seasoned car mechanic here in the US told me that these were among the most well designed and quality built cars ever. But ... Of course I secured a small stash of Plessey SL6440 mixers before it all imploded. -- Regards, Joerg http://www.analogconsultants.com/ "gmail" domain blocked because of excessive spam. Use another domain or send PM.
On Oct 11, 6:43&#2013266080;am, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote:
> On 10 Oct, 17:42, ste...@coppice.org wrote: > > > > > On Oct 10, 9:01&#2013266080;pm, Leon <leon...@btinternet.com> wrote: > > > > I've just ordered my 1600 MIPS XMOS XC-1 design kit. > > > > The XMOS chips will replace DSPs and FPGAs in a lot of applications. > > > > I haven't been so excited about a new chip since the transputer came > > > out. David May designed them both, of course. > > > > Leon > > > leon...@btinternet.com > > > Is the comparison with the Transputer supposed to imply this is a half > > thought out design with brain dead execution? :-\ > > > Steve > > The transputer was ahead of its time, and really pushed the technology > that was available. I sold a lot of systems using it, mostly to > universities and research establishments, because there was nothing > else around with that sort of performance then. Inmos even had their > own fab! > > Leon
Yes at the time it was way ahead. Trouble is that there was not many people who had given thought to paralel computing back then - even now it is experimental on the whole and not mainstream. Another machine of the time was made by Linn Products who make Hi-Fi.. http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=381711.381716 It was a small-talk machine called Recusiv - fully Object Orientated - again way ahead of its time. People had just started using C and were still using Fortran. Assembler was the only low level language available. Hardy