Forums

A discrete Fourier transform application

Started by Rick Lyons November 1, 2008
Hi Guys,
  did you see the discrete Fourier transform 
application at:

http://blog.wired.com/music/2008/10/how-a-professor.html

See Ya',
[-Rick-]

Rick Lyons <R.Lyons@_BOGUS_ieee.org> writes:

> Hi Guys, > did you see the discrete Fourier transform > application at: > > http://blog.wired.com/music/2008/10/how-a-professor.html
Oh man, that's really cool Rick! Thanks! I never knew George Martin "doubled" Harrison on the piano. I knew he played piano on several takes (e.g., I believe, the piano solo in "In My Life (I've Loved You More)". -- % Randy Yates % "How's life on earth? %% Fuquay-Varina, NC % ... What is it worth?" %%% 919-577-9882 % 'Mission (A World Record)', %%%% <yates@ieee.org> % *A New World Record*, ELO http://www.digitalsignallabs.com
On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 09:01:07 -0700, Rick Lyons
<R.Lyons@_BOGUS_ieee.org> wrote:

> >Hi Guys, > did you see the discrete Fourier transform >application at: > >http://blog.wired.com/music/2008/10/how-a-professor.html > >See Ya', >[-Rick-]
Interesting. Evidently funded by Canadian tax dollars. ;) Some of the comments are pretty funny, too: Why didn't he just ask George Martin? I can play that chord on my kazoo. I always thought "the Chord" could do with more cowbell. I have not cared less about anything in my entire life. Eric Jacobsen Minister of Algorithms Abineau Communications http://www.ericjacobsen.org Blog: http://www.dsprelated.com/blogs-1/hf/Eric_Jacobsen.php
Eric Jacobsen <eric.jacobsen@ieee.org> writes:

> On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 09:01:07 -0700, Rick Lyons > <R.Lyons@_BOGUS_ieee.org> wrote: > >> >>Hi Guys, >> did you see the discrete Fourier transform >>application at: >> >>http://blog.wired.com/music/2008/10/how-a-professor.html >> >>See Ya', >>[-Rick-] > > Interesting. Evidently funded by Canadian tax dollars. ;) > > Some of the comments are pretty funny, too: > > > Why didn't he just ask George Martin? > > I can play that chord on my kazoo. > > I always thought "the Chord" could do with more cowbell. > > I have not cared less about anything in my entire life.
I haven't heard any of these guys on the radio and national television, seen them open their own record label, or seen their music copied by other artists for decades, or rise to the greatest popularity of any band in the history of the world. Seems it's fairly easy, however, to demean others on an obscure message board 40 years after-the-fact without revealing your own identity. -- % Randy Yates % "My Shangri-la has gone away, fading like %% Fuquay-Varina, NC % the Beatles on 'Hey Jude'" %%% 919-577-9882 % %%%% <yates@ieee.org> % 'Shangri-La', *A New World Record*, ELO http://www.digitalsignallabs.com
On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 15:25:05 -0400, Randy Yates <yates@ieee.org>
wrote:

   (snipped by Lyons)
> >I haven't heard any of these guys on the radio and national television, >seen them open their own record label, or seen their music copied by >other artists for decades, or rise to the greatest popularity of any >band in the history of the world. > >Seems it's fairly easy, however, to demean others on an obscure message >board 40 years after-the-fact without revealing your own identity.
I'm with you Randy. (you comment reminded me of something I wrote, years ago.) -------------------- Upon the Death of George Harrison When I heard that Beatle George Harrison died, I went to my kitchen, immediately drank two bottles of German pilsner beer, and wrote the following: Well, half of the Beatles are gone now. George's death surprised me but initially didn't 'touch' me as strongly as the murder of John Lennon. However as this morning dragged along I felt a strange melancholy for a bygone time,...a lost era. One of my favorite Beatle songs is George's "Here Comes the Sun". It's so melodic and upbeat - cheerful really. That song is much more complex than the melody-less songs of today. It's the only Beatle song I can whistle and make it recognizable. No one before or after the 'baby boom' generation can understand how we felt about the Beatles. Every generation has "their" music, our parents did. And good music it was. How can we know the thrill that America's greatest generation (the young adults during World War II) felt when they heard the Tommy Dorsey or Glen Miller bands. If some ol' timer in a bar said to me, "Glen Miller's "In the Mood" is the greatest pop song of all time", I would not argue. Compare "In the Mood" to the excrement pumped out by Brittany Spears, Janet Jackson, and Eminem. Ha, what a joke!! Those three talentless pukes couldn't sing "Happy Birthday" to save their lives, let alone actually write a song. (Maybe I'm just being a crotchety ol' fart.) Back to the Beatles. Let me tell a simple little story for you young folk. In the 1960's AM radio stations played rock-n-roll music. They had this thing called the "Top 40" which was a listing of the most popular 40 songs for that week. At 5:00 PM, in my home town, the local AM radio station would start playing the "Top Forty" beginning with the 40th most popular song. They'd finish with the 1# song just before the 7:00 PM news. One time, I remember it clearly, of the top ten songs in the "Top Forty" seven of those ten were Beatle songs. Can ya' imagine? Of the top ten songs, seven were by the same group. *THAT* was the Beatles. I mustn't forget George's "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". (What a title!) I don't know what it is about music that makes some songs pierce right to your soul, but for me, that song stirs something. Who knows. When I hear that song I turn the car radio's volume up by 20 decibels. (I also crank the volume up for the Rolling Stones' "Sympathy For the Devil" and Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Senator's Son".) Beatle Paul McCartney once said that he and John Lennon never viewed George Harrison as a song writer. Few people did. George was thought of strictly as the group's lead guitarist. Paul followed on to say that he always wanted to hear Frank Sinatra sing a Beatles song. Well it happened, Frank did finally sing a Beatle song. Sinatra recorded George's beautiful song "Something". Ya' know, the popular singers of today (whose skills I consider nonexistent-to-poor, with the exception of Gloria Estefan) take 1.5 years to record an album, tour for six months, and then rest for 9 months to recover. Think of this: for *seven* straight years the Beatles produced two albums per year, and toured every year. During those years they also made two movies! [-Rick-]
Rick Lyons <R.Lyons@_BOGUS_ieee.org> writes:
> [...]
I enjoyed hearing some of your thoughts on the Beatles, Rick. If you haven't yet seen the Beatles Anthology DVDs, http://www.netflix.com/Movie/The_Beatles_Anthology/60030989?lnkctr=srchrd-sr&strkid=880686206_0_0 and you like the Beatles, they're WELL worth the time to watch, especially the first two. To see their rise in fame from their perspective is to understand them much more clearly. They were just four lads who didn't really realize what was happening to them! Yes, I too love "Here Comes The Sun". Indeed I like to hear the entire second side of the "Abbey Road" album at one sitting. For almost my entire 6th grade year, my brother and I had a ritual of listening to that side every Sunday afternoon after getting home from church and Sunday school. "Because" is also a notable selection on that album, as well as George's "Somthing" that you've already noted. I also am particularly fond of "She's So Heavy" (about the time it came out I was an aspiring organist and I loved the killer organ runs). The Beatles played rock and rock, but they were musicians. That means that their songs (for the most part) had definite themes, the music and harmonies were carefully arranged, they had mastered their instruments (I don't know of any bands who have yet mastered the technique they used to get that sliding sound in "Come Together"), and their music was complex thematically and lyrically. You don't get that way in a year playing on your Casio and tracking with a rhythm box. It took a lot of sweat in their early years playing together in many venues, and learning how to write, to gain that experience. Yes, I'm with you, too, Rick. God bless the Beatles, and their wives, children, friends, and lovers. --Randy
> On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 15:25:05 -0400, Randy Yates <yates@ieee.org> > wrote: > > (snipped by Lyons) >> >>I haven't heard any of these guys on the radio and national television, >>seen them open their own record label, or seen their music copied by >>other artists for decades, or rise to the greatest popularity of any >>band in the history of the world. >> >>Seems it's fairly easy, however, to demean others on an obscure message >>board 40 years after-the-fact without revealing your own identity. > > I'm with you Randy. (you comment reminded me of something I wrote, > years ago.) > -------------------- > Upon the Death of George Harrison > > When I heard that Beatle George Harrison died, I went to my kitchen, > immediately drank two bottles of German pilsner beer, and wrote the > following: > > Well, half of the Beatles are gone now. George's death surprised me > but initially didn't 'touch' me as strongly as the murder of John > Lennon. However as this morning dragged along I felt a strange > melancholy for a bygone time,...a lost era. > > One of my favorite Beatle songs is George's "Here Comes the Sun". It's > so melodic and upbeat - cheerful really. That song is much more > complex than the melody-less songs of today. It's the only Beatle > song I can whistle and make it recognizable. > > No one before or after the 'baby boom' generation can understand how > we felt about the Beatles. Every generation has "their" music, our > parents did. And good music it was. How can we know the thrill that > America's greatest generation (the young adults during World War II) > felt when they heard the Tommy Dorsey or Glen Miller bands. If some > ol' timer in a bar said to me, "Glen Miller's "In the Mood" is the > greatest pop song of all time", I would not argue. > > Compare "In the Mood" to the excrement pumped out by Brittany Spears, > Janet Jackson, and Eminem. Ha, what a joke!! Those three talentless > pukes couldn't sing "Happy Birthday" to save their lives, let alone > actually write a song. > (Maybe I'm just being a crotchety ol' fart.) > > Back to the Beatles. Let me tell a simple little story for you young > folk. In the 1960's AM radio stations played rock-n-roll music. They > had this thing called the "Top 40" which was a listing of the most > popular 40 songs for that week. At 5:00 PM, in my home town, the > local AM radio station would start playing the "Top Forty" beginning > with the 40th most popular song. They'd finish with the 1# song just > before the 7:00 PM news. One time, I remember it clearly, of the top > ten songs in the "Top Forty" seven of those ten were Beatle songs. Can > ya' imagine? Of the top ten songs, seven were by the same group. > *THAT* was the Beatles. > > I mustn't forget George's "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". (What a > title!) I don't know what it is about music that makes some songs > pierce right to your soul, but for me, that song stirs something. Who > knows. When I hear that song I turn the car radio's volume up by 20 > decibels. (I also crank the volume up for the Rolling Stones' > "Sympathy For the Devil" and Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Senator's > Son".) > > Beatle Paul McCartney once said that he and John Lennon never viewed > George Harrison as a song writer. Few people did. George was thought > of strictly as the group's lead guitarist. Paul followed on to say > that he always wanted to hear Frank Sinatra sing a Beatles song. Well > it happened, Frank did finally sing a Beatle song. Sinatra recorded > George's beautiful song "Something". > > Ya' know, the popular singers of today (whose skills I consider > nonexistent-to-poor, with the exception of Gloria Estefan) take 1.5 > years to record an album, tour for six months, and then rest for 9 > months to recover. Think of this: for *seven* straight years the > Beatles produced two albums per year, and toured every year. During > those years they also made two movies! > > [-Rick-]
-- % Randy Yates % "Rollin' and riding and slippin' and %% Fuquay-Varina, NC % sliding, it's magic." %%% 919-577-9882 % %%%% <yates@ieee.org> % 'Living' Thing', *A New World Record*, ELO http://www.digitalsignallabs.com
Randy Yates <yates@ieee.org> writes:

> The Beatles played rock and rock,
Doh! rock and _ROLL_! -- % Randy Yates % "...the answer lies within your soul %% Fuquay-Varina, NC % 'cause no one knows which side %%% 919-577-9882 % the coin will fall." %%%% <yates@ieee.org> % 'Big Wheels', *Out of the Blue*, ELO http://www.digitalsignallabs.com
On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 19:58:19 -0400, Randy Yates <yates@ieee.org>
wrote:

>Rick Lyons <R.Lyons@_BOGUS_ieee.org> writes: >> [...] > >I enjoyed hearing some of your thoughts on the Beatles, Rick. > >If you haven't yet seen the Beatles Anthology DVDs, > > http://www.netflix.com/Movie/The_Beatles_Anthology/60030989?lnkctr=srchrd-sr&strkid=880686206_0_0 > >and you like the Beatles, they're WELL worth the time to watch, >especially the first two. To see their rise in fame from their >perspective is to understand them much more clearly. They were just four >lads who didn't really realize what was happening to them! > >Yes, I too love "Here Comes The Sun". Indeed I like to hear the entire >second side of the "Abbey Road" album at one sitting. For almost my >entire 6th grade year, my brother and I had a ritual of listening to >that side every Sunday afternoon after getting home from church and >Sunday school. "Because" is also a notable selection on that album, as >well as George's "Somthing" that you've already noted. I also am >particularly fond of "She's So Heavy" (about the time it came out I was >an aspiring organist and I loved the killer organ runs). > >The Beatles played rock and rock, but they were musicians. That means >that their songs (for the most part) had definite themes, the music and >harmonies were carefully arranged, they had mastered their instruments >(I don't know of any bands who have yet mastered the technique they used >to get that sliding sound in "Come Together"), and their music was >complex thematically and lyrically.
Fretless bass. A good bass player with experience on a fretless can do that without too much trouble. They get a lot of credit for being creative and resetting a lot of the "rules". Definitely a talented bunch, and I wish there were some bands these days that had half the talent at arranging that those guys did. Nevertheless, that paper was a bit of a strain, I thought, but it is an interesting application of Fourier analysis. It seemed to be pretty light on the actual DSP, though. I just thought the comments were funny.
>You don't get that way in a year playing on your Casio and tracking with >a rhythm box. It took a lot of sweat in their early years playing >together in many venues, and learning how to write, to gain that >experience. > >Yes, I'm with you, too, Rick. God bless the Beatles, and their wives, >children, friends, and lovers. > >--Randy > > > >> On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 15:25:05 -0400, Randy Yates <yates@ieee.org> >> wrote: >> >> (snipped by Lyons) >>> >>>I haven't heard any of these guys on the radio and national television, >>>seen them open their own record label, or seen their music copied by >>>other artists for decades, or rise to the greatest popularity of any >>>band in the history of the world. >>> >>>Seems it's fairly easy, however, to demean others on an obscure message >>>board 40 years after-the-fact without revealing your own identity. >> >> I'm with you Randy. (you comment reminded me of something I wrote, >> years ago.) >> -------------------- >> Upon the Death of George Harrison >> >> When I heard that Beatle George Harrison died, I went to my kitchen, >> immediately drank two bottles of German pilsner beer, and wrote the >> following: >> >> Well, half of the Beatles are gone now. George's death surprised me >> but initially didn't 'touch' me as strongly as the murder of John >> Lennon. However as this morning dragged along I felt a strange >> melancholy for a bygone time,...a lost era. >> >> One of my favorite Beatle songs is George's "Here Comes the Sun". It's >> so melodic and upbeat - cheerful really. That song is much more >> complex than the melody-less songs of today. It's the only Beatle >> song I can whistle and make it recognizable. >> >> No one before or after the 'baby boom' generation can understand how >> we felt about the Beatles. Every generation has "their" music, our >> parents did. And good music it was. How can we know the thrill that >> America's greatest generation (the young adults during World War II) >> felt when they heard the Tommy Dorsey or Glen Miller bands. If some >> ol' timer in a bar said to me, "Glen Miller's "In the Mood" is the >> greatest pop song of all time", I would not argue. >> >> Compare "In the Mood" to the excrement pumped out by Brittany Spears, >> Janet Jackson, and Eminem. Ha, what a joke!! Those three talentless >> pukes couldn't sing "Happy Birthday" to save their lives, let alone >> actually write a song. >> (Maybe I'm just being a crotchety ol' fart.) >> >> Back to the Beatles. Let me tell a simple little story for you young >> folk. In the 1960's AM radio stations played rock-n-roll music. They >> had this thing called the "Top 40" which was a listing of the most >> popular 40 songs for that week. At 5:00 PM, in my home town, the >> local AM radio station would start playing the "Top Forty" beginning >> with the 40th most popular song. They'd finish with the 1# song just >> before the 7:00 PM news. One time, I remember it clearly, of the top >> ten songs in the "Top Forty" seven of those ten were Beatle songs. Can >> ya' imagine? Of the top ten songs, seven were by the same group. >> *THAT* was the Beatles. >> >> I mustn't forget George's "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". (What a >> title!) I don't know what it is about music that makes some songs >> pierce right to your soul, but for me, that song stirs something. Who >> knows. When I hear that song I turn the car radio's volume up by 20 >> decibels. (I also crank the volume up for the Rolling Stones' >> "Sympathy For the Devil" and Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Senator's >> Son".) >> >> Beatle Paul McCartney once said that he and John Lennon never viewed >> George Harrison as a song writer. Few people did. George was thought >> of strictly as the group's lead guitarist. Paul followed on to say >> that he always wanted to hear Frank Sinatra sing a Beatles song. Well >> it happened, Frank did finally sing a Beatle song. Sinatra recorded >> George's beautiful song "Something". >> >> Ya' know, the popular singers of today (whose skills I consider >> nonexistent-to-poor, with the exception of Gloria Estefan) take 1.5 >> years to record an album, tour for six months, and then rest for 9 >> months to recover. Think of this: for *seven* straight years the >> Beatles produced two albums per year, and toured every year. During >> those years they also made two movies! >> >> [-Rick-]
Eric Jacobsen Minister of Algorithms Abineau Communications http://www.ericjacobsen.org Blog: http://www.dsprelated.com/blogs-1/hf/Eric_Jacobsen.php
On Nov 1, 5:09&#2013266080;pm, Rick Lyons <R.Lyons@_BOGUS_ieee.org> wrote:

> -------------------- > &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080;Upon the Death of George Harrison > > When I heard that Beatle George Harrison died, I went to my kitchen, > immediately drank two bottles of German pilsner beer, and wrote the > following: > > Well, half of the Beatles are gone now. &#2013266080;George's death surprised me > but initially didn't 'touch' me as strongly as the murder of John > Lennon. &#2013266080;However as this morning dragged along I felt a strange > melancholy for a bygone time,...a lost era.
2001 was a strange (and sorta bad) year. watching the Stanley Kubrick film of the same name, i was expecting a large permanent space station and picturephones everywhere. instead we got the the inauguration to president of the USA of someone who literally lost and stole the election (which i also would have never thunk would happen in my lifetime). as Greg Berchin pointed out to me at http://www.freewayblogger.com/ , "Who would have thought that a lifelong failure would turn out to be such a lousy president?". anyway, we all know that the next BIG BAD EVENT in 2001 happened in September, the month that the Audio Engineering Society had scheduled for their convention in NYC. needless to say that got postponed until early December and it was a comparatively tiny convention. that's when George died. whenever i go to NYC (at least back then), i try to go to the Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Divine up close to Columbia on Amsterdam Ave. this is where the Paul Winter Consort is an artist in residence and does these Solitice concerts every year. they also had a really cool space-cadet organist for the cathedral named Dorothy Papadakos. at the end of the main Sunday service (the recessional) she played a reprise or sampler of all sorts of George Harrison songs integrated in with other organ music. it was great. then the next week, the Cathedral had a great fire that damaged some 16th century tapestries and gunked up the Great Organ which has been offline until this very fall (but i haven't been down there to verify that it's back online). the electronic organ used in the meantime just didn't have that certain something, and since Dorothy has left the cathedral. 2001 was a very bad year. for multiple reasons. r b-j
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