Forums

Silly problem with sound source localization

Started by lapidarylee April 30, 2009
Hi

supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field, does it apply
to sound source localization ?!

Maybe it is an extremely silly question, but I really want to know why or
why not


Regards
Ryan


On 30 Apr, 14:47, "lapidarylee" <Ryan_...@ali.com.tw> wrote:
> Hi > > supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field,
What's that? Do you know any on-line descriptions?
> does it apply > to sound source localization ?!
'Supersonic' necessarily relates to sound sources... Apart from that, using acoustics to locate objects travelling at supersonic speeds is not at all easy. First of all, they travel so fast that by the time your sensor(s) locate the sound, the source has travelled a very long distance. Second, the angle between the shock wave and the path of travel depends on the speed of the object. So you need to know at least the speed of the source (and maybe more parameters) to work out the location. Rune
Rune Allnor wrote:
> On 30 Apr, 14:47, "lapidarylee" <Ryan_...@ali.com.tw> wrote: >> Hi >> >> supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field, > > What's that? Do you know any on-line descriptions? > >> does it apply >> to sound source localization ?! > > 'Supersonic' necessarily relates to sound sources... > > Apart from that, using acoustics to locate objects > travelling at supersonic speeds is not at all easy. > First of all, they travel so fast that by the time > your sensor(s) locate the sound, the source has > travelled a very long distance. > > Second, the angle between the shock wave and the > path of travel depends on the speed of the object. > So you need to know at least the speed of the source > (and maybe more parameters) to work out the location.
I think he actually means ultrasonic. Confusing the words is a common error. Most ultrasonic location techniques I know of are effectively sonar, so maybe he means what he wrote. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Rune Allnor wrote:
> On 30 Apr, 14:47, "lapidarylee" <Ryan_...@ali.com.tw> wrote: >> Hi >> >> supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field, > > What's that? Do you know any on-line descriptions? > >> does it apply >> to sound source localization ?! > > 'Supersonic' necessarily relates to sound sources... > > Apart from that, using acoustics to locate objects > travelling at supersonic speeds is not at all easy. > First of all, they travel so fast that by the time > your sensor(s) locate the sound, the source has > travelled a very long distance. > > Second, the angle between the shock wave and the > path of travel depends on the speed of the object. > So you need to know at least the speed of the source > (and maybe more parameters) to work out the location.
I think he actually means ultrasonic. Confusing the words is a common error. Most ultrasonic location techniques I know of are effectively sonar, so maybe he means what he wrote. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Rune Allnor wrote:
> On 30 Apr, 14:47, "lapidarylee" <Ryan_...@ali.com.tw> wrote: >> Hi >> >> supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field, > > What's that? Do you know any on-line descriptions? > >> does it apply >> to sound source localization ?! > > 'Supersonic' necessarily relates to sound sources... > > Apart from that, using acoustics to locate objects > travelling at supersonic speeds is not at all easy. > First of all, they travel so fast that by the time > your sensor(s) locate the sound, the source has > travelled a very long distance. > > Second, the angle between the shock wave and the > path of travel depends on the speed of the object. > So you need to know at least the speed of the source > (and maybe more parameters) to work out the location.
I think he actually means ultrasonic. Confusing the words is a common error. Most ultrasonic location techniques I know of are effectively sonar, so maybe he means what he wrote. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
On 30 Apr, 16:21, Jerry Avins <j...@ieee.org> wrote:
> Rune Allnor wrote: > > On 30 Apr, 14:47, "lapidarylee" <Ryan_...@ali.com.tw> wrote: > >> Hi > > >> supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field, > > > What's that? Do you know any on-line descriptions? > > >> &#2013266080;does it apply > >> to sound source localization ?! > > > 'Supersonic' necessarily relates to sound sources... > > > Apart from that, using acoustics to locate objects > > travelling at supersonic speeds is not at all easy. > > First of all, they travel so fast that by the time > > your sensor(s) locate the sound, the source has > > travelled a very long distance. > > > Second, the angle between the shock wave and the > > path of travel depends on the speed of the object. > > So you need to know at least the speed of the source > > (and maybe more parameters) to work out the location. > > I think he actually means ultrasonic. Confusing the words is a common > error.
Maybe you're right. If so, I wouldn't have guessed.
> Most ultrasonic location techniques I know of are effectively > sonar, so maybe he means what he wrote.
Well... ultrasonic localization of *objects* is wide-spread, but I can't remember having heard about localizations of ultrasonic *sources*. Possibly except for bats. Rune
On Apr 30, 10:28&#2013266080;am, Rune Allnor <all...@tele.ntnu.no> wrote:
> On 30 Apr, 16:21, Jerry Avins <j...@ieee.org> wrote: > > > > > > > Rune Allnor wrote: > > > On 30 Apr, 14:47, "lapidarylee" <Ryan_...@ali.com.tw> wrote: > > >> Hi > > > >> supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field, > > > > What's that? Do you know any on-line descriptions? > > > >> &#2013266080;does it apply > > >> to sound source localization ?! > > > > 'Supersonic' necessarily relates to sound sources... > > > > Apart from that, using acoustics to locate objects > > > travelling at supersonic speeds is not at all easy. > > > First of all, they travel so fast that by the time > > > your sensor(s) locate the sound, the source has > > > travelled a very long distance. > > > > Second, the angle between the shock wave and the > > > path of travel depends on the speed of the object. > > > So you need to know at least the speed of the source > > > (and maybe more parameters) to work out the location. > > > I think he actually means ultrasonic. Confusing the words is a common > > error. > > Maybe you're right. If so, I wouldn't have guessed. > > > Most ultrasonic location techniques I know of are effectively > > sonar, so maybe he means what he wrote. > > Well... ultrasonic localization of *objects* is wide-spread, > but I can't remember having heard about localizations of > ultrasonic *sources*. Possibly except for bats. > > Rune- Hide quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
Cats do it quite well - adults hear up to 60kHz, kittens even higher. Cats locate moles and other rodents this way. Clay
On Apr 30, 10:28=A0am, Rune Allnor <all...@tele.ntnu.no> wrote:
> On 30 Apr, 16:21, Jerry Avins <j...@ieee.org> wrote: > > > > > > > Rune Allnor wrote: > > > On 30 Apr, 14:47, "lapidarylee" <Ryan_...@ali.com.tw> wrote: > > >> Hi > > > >> supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field, > > > > What's that? Do you know any on-line descriptions? > > > >> =A0does it apply > > >> to sound source localization ?! > > > > 'Supersonic' necessarily relates to sound sources... > > > > Apart from that, using acoustics to locate objects > > > travelling at supersonic speeds is not at all easy. > > > First of all, they travel so fast that by the time > > > your sensor(s) locate the sound, the source has > > > travelled a very long distance. > > > > Second, the angle between the shock wave and the > > > path of travel depends on the speed of the object. > > > So you need to know at least the speed of the source > > > (and maybe more parameters) to work out the location. > > > I think he actually means ultrasonic. Confusing the words is a common > > error. > > Maybe you're right. If so, I wouldn't have guessed. > > > Most ultrasonic location techniques I know of are effectively > > sonar, so maybe he means what he wrote. > > Well... ultrasonic localization of *objects* is wide-spread, > but I can't remember having heard about localizations of > ultrasonic *sources*. Possibly except for bats. > > Rune- Hide quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
Cats do it quite well - adults hear up to 60kHz, kittens even higher. Cats locate moles and other rodents this way. Clay
On May 1, 2:37&#2013266080;am, c...@claysturner.com wrote:
> On Apr 30, 10:28&#2013266080;am, Rune Allnor <all...@tele.ntnu.no> wrote: > > > > > On 30 Apr, 16:21, Jerry Avins <j...@ieee.org> wrote: > > > > Rune Allnor wrote: > > > > On 30 Apr, 14:47, "lapidarylee" <Ryan_...@ali.com.tw> wrote: > > > >> Hi > > > > >> supersonic localization tech is widely used in many field, > > > > > What's that? Do you know any on-line descriptions? > > > > >> &#2013266080;does it apply > > > >> to sound source localization ?! > > > > > 'Supersonic' necessarily relates to sound sources... > > > > > Apart from that, using acoustics to locate objects > > > > travelling at supersonic speeds is not at all easy. > > > > First of all, they travel so fast that by the time > > > > your sensor(s) locate the sound, the source has > > > > travelled a very long distance. > > > > > Second, the angle between the shock wave and the > > > > path of travel depends on the speed of the object. > > > > So you need to know at least the speed of the source > > > > (and maybe more parameters) to work out the location. > > > > I think he actually means ultrasonic. Confusing the words is a common > > > error. > > > Maybe you're right. If so, I wouldn't have guessed. > > > > Most ultrasonic location techniques I know of are effectively > > > sonar, so maybe he means what he wrote. > > > Well... ultrasonic localization of *objects* is wide-spread, > > but I can't remember having heard about localizations of > > ultrasonic *sources*. Possibly except for bats. > > > Rune- Hide quoted text - > > > - Show quoted text - > > Cats do it quite well - adults hear up to 60kHz, kittens even higher. > Cats locate moles and other rodents this way. > > Clay
Here's a good question, how do insects see in the dark? Say a mosquito - do they have infra read? Hardy
On 1 Mai, 05:04, HardySpicer <gyansor...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Here's a good question, how do insects see in the dark? Say a mosquito > - do they have infra read?
Don't know how reliable it is, but the word around here is that mosquitos locate potential targets from the target's CO emissions. There are, apparently, a couple of other factors as well, like that the mosquitos are more inclined to go for dark-colored targets than light-color targets (I suppose furs of the mammals around here tend to be dark). Locating targets from CO would certainly work any time of day. Or night. Rune