Forums

Re: OT The "parallel generators" conundrum

Started by Jerry Avins January 18, 2011
That's not what he did. By running the load current -- not the individual dynamo currents -- through the compounding coils on all the dynamos, whether in service or not, the powerhouse can have the necessary negative resistance characteristic while the individual dynamos can behave as if they were uncompounded. The scheme uses an "equalizer bus". Pure genius!

Jerry
On Jan 18, 10:27&#2013266080;pm, Jerry Avins <j...@ieee.org> wrote:
> That's not what he did. By running the load current -- not the individual dynamo currents -- through the compounding coils on all the dynamos, whether in service or not, the powerhouse can have the necessary negative resistance characteristic while the individual dynamos can behave as if they were uncompounded. The scheme uses an "equalizer bus". Pure genius! > > Jerry
You know I've spent a lot of time studying the history of science mostly with an interest on the scientists and their solutions given the academic and technological limitations of their times. And I never ceased to be amazed at what those guys (gals too) achieved. Edison combined his genus with a hard work ethic and business acumen to achieve many great results. Linking the generators that way is purely genus, but I bet he tried many methods until he achieved this one. It is sort of like when you see a concise mathematical proof. And you wonder how in the hell did that get figured out. But then you find out a significant amount of work preceded the final polished solution. Edison had a drive to constantly improve things. Clay
On Tue, 18 Jan 2011 19:27:15 -0800, Jerry Avins wrote:

> That's not what he did. By running the load current -- not the > individual dynamo currents -- through the compounding coils on all the > dynamos, whether in service or not, the powerhouse can have the > necessary negative resistance characteristic while the individual > dynamos can behave as if they were uncompounded. The scheme uses an > "equalizer bus". Pure genius! > > Jerry
My mistake, I should not have credited Edison with the far more ingenious inventions of Tesla, which, unlike Edison's DC dynamos, are still in widespread use today. Glen
On Wed, 19 Jan 2011 08:22:44 -0800 (PST), Clay <clay@claysturner.com>
wrote:

>On Jan 18, 10:27=A0pm, Jerry Avins <j...@ieee.org> wrote: >> That's not what he did. By running the load current -- not the individual= > dynamo currents -- through the compounding coils on all the dynamos, wheth= >er in service or not, the powerhouse can have the necessary negative resist= >ance characteristic while the individual dynamos can behave as if they were= > uncompounded. The scheme uses an "equalizer bus". Pure genius! >> >> Jerry > >You know I've spent a lot of time studying the history of science >mostly with an interest on the scientists and their solutions given >the academic and technological limitations of their times. And I never >ceased to be amazed at what those guys (gals too) achieved.
Here's a nice reference that you may not have seen previously: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gOR91oentQ ;)
>Edison combined his genus with a hard work ethic and business acumen >to achieve many great results. Linking the generators that way is >purely genus, but I bet he tried many methods until he achieved this >one. It is sort of like when you see a concise mathematical proof. And >you wonder how in the hell did that get figured out. But then you find >out a significant amount of work preceded the final polished solution. >Edison had a drive to constantly improve things. > >Clay
Eric Jacobsen Minister of Algorithms Abineau Communications http://www.abineau.com
On Jan 20, 5:22&#2013266080;am, Clay <c...@claysturner.com> wrote:
> On Jan 18, 10:27&#2013266080;pm, Jerry Avins <j...@ieee.org> wrote: > > > That's not what he did. By running the load current -- not the individual dynamo currents -- through the compounding coils on all the dynamos, whether in service or not, the powerhouse can have the necessary negative resistance characteristic while the individual dynamos can behave as if they were uncompounded. The scheme uses an "equalizer bus". Pure genius! > > > Jerry > > You know I've spent a lot of time studying the history of science > mostly with an interest on the scientists and their solutions given > the academic and technological limitations of their times. And I never > ceased to be amazed at what those guys (gals too) achieved. > > Edison combined his genus with a hard work ethic and business acumen > to achieve many great results. Linking the generators that way is > purely genus, but I bet he tried many methods until he achieved this > one. It is sort of like when you see a concise mathematical proof. And > you wonder how in the hell did that get figured out. But then you find > out a significant amount of work preceded the final polished solution. > Edison had a drive to constantly improve things. > > Clay
Saw Spencer Tracy do this with a mechanical link bewteen the generators...
On Jan 20, 7:55&#2013266080;am, Glen Walpert <nos...@null.void> wrote:
> On Tue, 18 Jan 2011 19:27:15 -0800, Jerry Avins wrote: > > That's not what he did. By running the load current -- not the > > individual dynamo currents -- through the compounding coils on all the > > dynamos, whether in service or not, the powerhouse can have the > > necessary negative resistance characteristic while the individual > > dynamos can behave as if they were uncompounded. The scheme uses an > > "equalizer bus". Pure genius! > > > Jerry > > My mistake, I should not have credited Edison with the far more ingenious > inventions of Tesla, which, unlike Edison's DC dynamos, are still in > widespread use today. > > Glen
Sis you know that the switched reluctance motor was invented before the ordinary AC motor?
HardySpicer <gyansorova@gmail.com> wrote:
(snip)

> Sis you know that the switched reluctance motor was invented before > the ordinary AC motor?
Even more fun, as I remember the story, is that the generator was invented before the motor. I believe that was the DC generator and motor, where someone, at a Chicago fair as I remember, had two generators hooked up and noticed that turning one would cause the other to turn. -- glen