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Tom Stockham's passing, see rec.audio.pro

Started by Max Hauser January 9, 2004
I didn't cross-post it, and I won't multiple-post it, but some of you may
have heard of Tom Stockham (pioneering applier of blind-deconvolution
techniques and Other Matters), and might like to see memorial remarks that I
and others posted recently on rec.audio.pro, where I first saw this news.
(I cited certain other highly-technical innovators also, and a little DSP
history, in my own message.)

Now please excuse me, I have scarcely posted in this newsgroup since 1992
[Note 1].

Very truly yours,

Max W. Hauser


--
(Note 1:  That was after someone's innocent request for information in May
1991, here and on sci.electronics, on how to do 180-degree phase shifting,
prompted a now-classic chorus of Usenet-type responses, subsequently edited
and re-posted as Message-ID <51184 @ prls.UUCP> , amazing to me, to Bob
Pease I understand, and to many others who saw it then and since, and that
moreover shows promise of entertaining audiences through the ages!)


Thanks for the notification, Max. That is certainly noteworthy. Dr.
Stockham's 1978 (?) IEEE paper on deconvolution was one of the motivating
influences in my life to pursue a career in DSP. I am thankful for the
contributions he made in the field.

--Randy

Max Hauser wrote:

> I didn't cross-post it, and I won't multiple-post it, but some of you may > have heard of Tom Stockham (pioneering applier of blind-deconvolution > techniques and Other Matters), and might like to see memorial remarks that I > and others posted recently on rec.audio.pro, where I first saw this news. > (I cited certain other highly-technical innovators also, and a little DSP > history, in my own message.) > > Now please excuse me, I have scarcely posted in this newsgroup since 1992 > [Note 1]. > > Very truly yours, > > Max W. Hauser > > > -- > (Note 1: That was after someone's innocent request for information in May > 1991, here and on sci.electronics, on how to do 180-degree phase shifting, > prompted a now-classic chorus of Usenet-type responses, subsequently edited > and re-posted as Message-ID <51184 @ prls.UUCP> , amazing to me, to Bob > Pease I understand, and to many others who saw it then and since, and that > moreover shows promise of entertaining audiences through the ages!) > >
-- % Randy Yates % "...the answer lies within your soul %% Fuquay-Varina, NC % 'cause no one knows which side %%% 919-577-9882 % the coin will fall." %%%% <yates@ieee.org> % 'Big Wheels', *Out of the Blue*, ELO http://home.earthlink.net/~yatescr

hey Max,

i'm really happy to see you post and i will always remember Toronto 1989
when you told the Crystal guy that they should just hang a few more
"marketing" bits offa that successive approximation register and call that
16 bit A/D a 20 or 22 bit A/D.  that was a classic moment.  also was the
first slide of your sigma-delta paper with the different "kingdoms"  (i only
remember AES as the "blue kingdom").

r b-j

In article vvshvqc62ddu83@corp.supernews.com, Max Hauser at max@tdl.com
wrote on 01/09/2004 01:19:

> I didn't cross-post it, and I won't multiple-post it, but some of you may > have heard of Tom Stockham (pioneering applier of blind-deconvolution > techniques and Other Matters), and might like to see memorial remarks that I > and others posted recently on rec.audio.pro, where I first saw this news. > (I cited certain other highly-technical innovators also, and a little DSP > history, in my own message.) > > Now please excuse me, I have scarcely posted in this newsgroup since 1992 > [Note 1]. > > Very truly yours, > > Max W. Hauser > > > -- > (Note 1: That was after someone's innocent request for information in May > 1991, here and on sci.electronics, on how to do 180-degree phase shifting, > prompted a now-classic chorus of Usenet-type responses, subsequently edited > and re-posted as Message-ID <51184 @ prls.UUCP> , amazing to me, to Bob > Pease I understand, and to many others who saw it then and since, and that > moreover shows promise of entertaining audiences through the ages!) > >
"robert bristow-johnson" <rbj@surfglobal.net> wrote in message
news:BC24FEC3.7926%rbj@surfglobal.net...
> > > hey Max, > > i'm really happy to see you post and i will always remember Toronto 1989 > when you told the Crystal guy that they should just hang a few more > "marketing" bits offa that successive approximation register and call that > 16 bit A/D a 20 or 22 bit A/D. that was a classic moment. also was the > first slide of your sigma-delta paper with the different "kingdoms" (i
only
> remember AES as the "blue kingdom"). > > r b-j
Thank you, that is kind. (In detail, 1989 was technically Burr-Brown, not Crystal, and it was a very well respected veteran analog designer, Jimmy Naylor if memory serves, whom I engaged in public exchange; memory is, of course, subject to correction by reality.) All of this is offhand and late at night at the moment. However The AES, having after all something to do with Audio, has the classy habit of recording almost all of its technical sessions, and therefore I have this, as well as sundry other, exchanges on tape. (One of the few not recorded -- Berlin, 1993 -- appears below in transcript, originally for a different context, for your possible amusement). The multi-colored map of the Technical Kingdoms where research on oversampling data conversion took place was a stylized parallel of Lyman Frank Baum's four-color map of the fictional Land of Oz (Winkies, Gillikans, Quadlings, and Munchkins -- the Munchkins being of course blue, like the JAES -- everybody likes the Munchkins, they remember the movie); this photo was commissioned by me in 1990 from an enterprising scientific photographer in Ithaca, New York, who assembled four major technical journal cover pages into a color photo resembling the Oz antecedent. (IEEE J. Solid-State Circuits, IEEE Tr. on ASSP -- underwent title change about then; IEEE Tr. Communications or CAS, I'm not sure which, CAS would be the better parallel, because of the particular yellow it uses; and J. AES, more or less respectively.) Photographer had to cut the covers off the journals to do that. (Since I did not use the four-color map slide until September 1990 in Los Angeles, tho many times thereafter, you must have seen multiple presentations.) Finally as a detail of historical record it is, and invariably was for the first dozen years or so, and often thereater, "delta-sigma," see the defining papers by Inose, Yasuda, and (in one case) Murakami in 1962 and 1963. (One of these stressed even in its title that "delta-sigma" was by definition a one-bit, as well as an oversampling and noise-shaping, encoding, though these details are sometimes overlooked today by newcomers.) With kind regards -- Max W. Hauser -- In March 1993, after unification, I was in Berlin for a conference of audio engineers. ... It was an unusual technical conference as it coincided with the 50th anniv'y of stereo tape recording -- practiced in Berlin in 1943, recording heartbreakingly tender piano solos with Furtwaengler directing, while bombs fell outside! Juxtaposition of the soaring spirit with apocalypse -- highs and lows of human condition. Samples were played very movingly at the opening of the conference, by some of the same engineers from 1943. Anyway later in the conference, I delivered a paper on a type of custom silicon signal processing chip that could be rapidly designed and prototyped. Now you might have seen the 1956 novel _From Russia with Love_ by Ian Fleming, with an early scene where a group of Stalinist officials meet to plan an international incident while maneuvering and infighting among themselves. (That and other gothic details departed in the movie adaptation, where the villains became a criminal mafia instead.) The meeting is chaired by a General Grubozaboyshikov with an atmosphere of delicate menace. (... "Let us smoke, comrades," said General G, putting an American Zippo lighter to one of his own Moskva-Volga cigarettes. There was a clicking of lighters around the table.") The 1993 audience was interested, and in the course of some question-and-answer, there was a particular exchange. "What happens if you design these chips of yours for a customer on a tight schedule, and the prototypes don't work?" asked one of the Europeans. In that case, I replied, "in the words of General Grubozaboyshikov in the novel _From Russia With Love,_ `there will be -- displeasure.' " (They liked that.)
Max Hauser wrote:
 > [...]
> Finally as a detail of historical record it is, and > invariably was for the first dozen years or so, and often thereater, > "delta-sigma," see the defining papers by Inose, Yasuda, and (in one case) > Murakami in 1962 and 1963.
*YES*!!! (told you so, Robert...) -- % Randy Yates % "...the answer lies within your soul %% Fuquay-Varina, NC % 'cause no one knows which side %%% 919-577-9882 % the coin will fall." %%%% <yates@ieee.org> % 'Big Wheels', *Out of the Blue*, ELO http://home.earthlink.net/~yatescr