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OT: Xmas wishes to you guys

Started by Rick Lyons December 18, 2003
Rick Lyons wrote:
> On 19 Dec 2003 20:32:32 -0800, allnor@tele.ntnu.no (Rune Allnor) > wrote:
>>Here's the season's greetings in Norwegian: >> >> God Jul og Godt Nytt�r til alle sammen! >> >>Rune > > > Ah ha, neat. > > Rune, what does it mean?
Just taking a guess, good Yule and good new year to all ... er... salmon. -- "Without music to decorate it, time is just a bunch of boring production deadlines or dates by which bills must be paid." --FZ
r.lyons@REMOVE.ieee.org (Rick Lyons) wrote in message news:<3fe447ec.91151937@news.west.earthlink.net>...
> On 19 Dec 2003 20:32:32 -0800, allnor@tele.ntnu.no (Rune Allnor) > wrote: > > >r.lyons@REMOVE.ieee.org (Rick Lyons) wrote in message news:<3fe206fa.274026125@news.west.earthlink.net>... > >> Hi, before I forget: > >> > >> Here's wishin' you guys a Merry Christmas and > >> a Happy New Year! > >> > >> Of course, these good wishes are also directed at any > >> of you who do not celebrate Christmas such as: Muslims, > >> Hindi, God-less Atheists, Buddhists, motorcycle mechanics, > >> Sikhs, Jews, IIR filter designers, Shinto, Democrats, > >> Neo-Pagans, Government Employees, Scientologists, > >> people from Ohio, and Rastafarians. > >> > >> [-Rick-] > > > >Here's the season's greetings in Norwegian: > > > > God Jul og Godt Nytt&#2013265925;r til alle sammen! > > > >Rune > > Ah ha, neat. > > Rune, what does it mean? > > [-Rick-]
The literal translation is "good yule and good new year for every body". When Christianity was introduced in Scandinavia some thousand years ago, the Christian priests did what they apparently did everywhere: They "stole" the native fiests and holidays and said "we do not celebrate in honour of Odin and Thor, but in honour of the Christian God, Jesus and Holy Spirit", and let the fiest go on almost as before, at the same holy places, at the same time of year, but perhaps in a different way and under a different name. I don't know if the Celts or Saxons of Britain had a mid winter fiest (they probably did) but the English name "Christmas" refers to a "Mass in the honour of Christ". Now, the norsemen had their main religious fiest, the "Jol", when the winter was at its darkest. All the main worshiping in honour of Odin, Thor, and the lot was done at that time during the "Jol blot", "blot" meaning (I am sure you can see the similarity between the words) something like "worship by blood at the time of yule". The "blot" involved blood sacrifices of animals and possibly humans. As it turned out, the kings and priests who introduced Christianity decided it would be a bad political move to mess too much with the "Jol" fiest, so they were content with introducing the Christian legends and establish a Christian tradition in the celebration, and let the ancient name of the fiest live on. Apart from giving a brutal piece of history a nice touch (I'm not all that sympathetic with crusaders and I like the fact that the "crusading" priests did not get their ways in absolutely everything) it gives people with a, let's say, relaxed attitude to Christianity an excuse to take part in the celebration. And since the ancient norse religion is extinct, it's completely PC to express the wish of a happy holliday without finding yourself in various religious and ethnical mine fields. God Jul! Rune
"Eric C. Weaver" <weav@sigma.net> wrote in message news:<3fe484be@news.announcetech.com>...
> Rick Lyons wrote: > > On 19 Dec 2003 20:32:32 -0800, allnor@tele.ntnu.no (Rune Allnor) > > wrote: > > >>Here's the season's greetings in Norwegian: > >> > >> God Jul og Godt Nytt&#2013265925;r til alle sammen! > >> > >>Rune > > > > > > Ah ha, neat. > > > > Rune, what does it mean? > > Just taking a guess, good Yule and good new year to all ... er... salmon.
Almost correct. "alle sammen" means "everybody". The fish "salmon" is called "laks" in Norwegian. I think "laks" or something very similar is used in certain English names for fish dishes? Rune
Eric C. Weaver wrote:

> Rick Lyons wrote: > >> On 19 Dec 2003 20:32:32 -0800, allnor@tele.ntnu.no (Rune Allnor) >> wrote: > > >>> Here's the season's greetings in Norwegian: >>> God Jul og Godt Nytt&#2013265925;r til alle sammen! >>> >>> Rune >> >> >> >> Ah ha, neat. >> >> Rune, what does it mean? > > > Just taking a guess, good Yule and good new year to all ... er... salmon.
Extrapolating from Yiddish: alle sammen -> all things. Happy holidays, everyone. Tonight I lit the second candle. It'll be New Years in Berkeley again. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
On 20 Dec 2003 12:23:42 -0800, allnor@tele.ntnu.no (Rune Allnor)
wrote:

  (all snipped)
> >God Jul! > >Rune
Hi Rune, thanks for the *very* interesting post. [-Rick-]
Rune Allnor wrote:

> "Eric C. Weaver" <weav@sigma.net> wrote in message news:<3fe484be@news.announcetech.com>... > >>Rick Lyons wrote: >> >>>On 19 Dec 2003 20:32:32 -0800, allnor@tele.ntnu.no (Rune Allnor) >>>wrote: >> >> >> >>>>Here's the season's greetings in Norwegian: >>>> >>>>God Jul og Godt Nytt&#2013265925;r til alle sammen! >>>> >>>>Rune >>> >>> >>>Ah ha, neat. >>> >>>Rune, what does it mean? >> >>Just taking a guess, good Yule and good new year to all ... er... salmon. > > > Almost correct. "alle sammen" means "everybody". The fish "salmon" > is called "laks" in Norwegian. I think "laks" or something very similar > is used in certain English names for fish dishes? > > Rune
"Lachs" in other Germanic language. "Lox" is smoked salmon in American English. It comes from Eastern Europe where, before refrigeration, lox and gravlax were all the salmon that people in the interior knew. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Jerry Avins <jya@ieee.org> wrote in message news:<3fe4d2c7$0$4751$61fed72c@news.rcn.com>...
> Rune Allnor wrote: > > > "Eric C. Weaver" <weav@sigma.net> wrote in message news:<3fe484be@news.announcetech.com>... > > > >>Rick Lyons wrote: > >> > >>>On 19 Dec 2003 20:32:32 -0800, allnor@tele.ntnu.no (Rune Allnor) > >>>wrote: > >> > >> > >> > >>>>Here's the season's greetings in Norwegian: > >>>> > >>>>God Jul og Godt Nytt&#2013265925;r til alle sammen! > >>>> > >>>>Rune > >>> > >>> > >>>Ah ha, neat. > >>> > >>>Rune, what does it mean? > >> > >>Just taking a guess, good Yule and good new year to all ... er... salmon. > > > > > > Almost correct. "alle sammen" means "everybody". The fish "salmon" > > is called "laks" in Norwegian. I think "laks" or something very similar > > is used in certain English names for fish dishes? > > > > Rune > > "Lachs" in other Germanic language. "Lox" is smoked salmon in American > English. It comes from Eastern Europe where, before refrigeration, lox > and gravlax were all the salmon that people in the interior knew.
In that case, the words probably come from the Scandinavian languages, although not necessarily Norwegian. The Swedes historically had far stronger influence to the east, and the Norwegian, Swedish and Danish languages differ only in cosmetic details. The name "gravlaks" is a concatenation made from the words "&#2013265925; grave" (literally "to dig", could be stretched to include "to bury") and "laks" (salmon). According to folklore (I don't know if this is the true explanation, but it could very well be) salmon was preserved by storing the raw fish in a container, only sprinkeled with sugar and salt, before being put away in storage for weeks or months. This causes a certain maturing/cooking process to take place in the fish meat (not entirely dissimilar to the Italian carpaccio(?), although that one cooks in minutes). According to legend, the "storage" originally was a hole in the ground where the container was buried. Thus the name "gravlaks", "buried salmon". Gravlaks should not be confused with the "real thing", the "rakfisk". In the latter case the fish is left in the container to "mature" without sugar or salt or anything else. Where "gravlaks" can be compared to smoked slamon in both taste and appearance, the "rakfisk" requires somewhat more of an "acquired taste". Rune
Rune Allnor wrote:

   ...


> Gravlaks should not be confused with the "real thing", the "rakfisk". > In the latter case the fish is left in the container to "mature" without > sugar or salt or anything else. Where "gravlaks" can be compared to > smoked slamon in both taste and appearance, the "rakfisk" requires > somewhat more of an "acquired taste". > > Rune
Speaking of acquired taste in fish, only dire necessity and long tradition could transmute lutfisk into a delicacy. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Jerry Avins <jya@ieee.org> wrote in message news:<3fe5db06$0$4752$61fed72c@news.rcn.com>...
> Rune Allnor wrote: > > ... > > > > Gravlaks should not be confused with the "real thing", the "rakfisk". > > In the latter case the fish is left in the container to "mature" without > > sugar or salt or anything else. Where "gravlaks" can be compared to > > smoked slamon in both taste and appearance, the "rakfisk" requires > > somewhat more of an "acquired taste". > > > > Rune > > Speaking of acquired taste in fish, only dire necessity and > long tradition could transmute lutfisk into a delicacy. > > Jerry
Most certainly. There are some historical people I would really like to see, although from a very safe distance: The first person in the world to eat "rakfisk" would be one, the first person ever to eat "lutefisk" is another. "Lutefisk" is based on dried fish (cod), which is a traditional way of preserving fish in the northern parts of Norway. Now, using this dried fish (which resembles a piece of wood) usually involves soaking it in water for some time. In the case of the "lutefisk", however, the soaking is done with a twist: You add "lut", which is the Norwegian antonym of acid (sorry, I never read chemistry in English so I don't know the terminology of chemistry. "Lut" is some compund that makes a strong basic(?) solution, i.e. with pH >> 7) to the water where you soak the dried fish. After reconstituting the fish in this "lut", rinse in running fresh water for a couple of days. Then, let the fish boil gently for a few minutes and serve with boiled potatoes, mushy peas and fried bacon + the local essential garnish, which varies from place to place. I think "lutefisk" is a basically(!) insane dish from a cooking point of view. It takes a very particular kind of imagination (not to mention motivation) to invent a dish like this. Wow, Jerry, how come you know so much about northern European cuisine? Rune
"Jaime Andres Aranguren Cardona" <jaime.aranguren@ieee.org> wrote in message
news:14a86f87.0312191002.3ce09e02@posting.google.com...
> Best wishes for Xtmas and New Year, for all the people in comp.dsp!!!
Me, too - Be happy and don't worry in X-max and New Year, all people in comp.dsp. Especially people who have helped me and have read my article. -- Regards, --- James K. (txdiversity@hotmail.com) - Any remarks, proposal and/or indicator to text would be greatly respected. - Private opinions: These are not the opinions from my affiliation. [Home] http://home.naver.com/txdiversity