Forums

space-time coding vs. LDPC

Started by walala October 28, 2003
Dear all,

In a course error control coding, we've assigned project to write a report
on coding... the project is a little "strange" that we need to simulate that
we are teachers who need to prepare problems and solutions and also slides
for teaching these topics. We are complete free in which topic to choose...
but can you give me some suggestions which topic to choose? Space-time
coding, LDPC, or else? I don't have any knowledge for these now and I am
expected to be able to present/teach the topic I've chosen. Could you please
give some suggestions? On which topic to choose which one is better, where
to find resources for slides and problems/solutions(these are quite new
topics, so I really cannot find textbook on these, not to say find problems
and further provide solutions for teaching...), tutorials, lecture notes?

Thanks in advance!

-Walalal


walala wrote:
> Dear all, > > In a course error control coding, we've assigned project to write a report > on coding... the project is a little "strange" that we need to simulate that > we are teachers who need to prepare problems and solutions and also slides > for teaching these topics. We are complete free in which topic to choose... > but can you give me some suggestions which topic to choose? Space-time > coding, LDPC, or else? I don't have any knowledge for these now and I am > expected to be able to present/teach the topic I've chosen. Could you please > give some suggestions? On which topic to choose which one is better, where > to find resources for slides and problems/solutions(these are quite new > topics, so I really cannot find textbook on these, not to say find problems > and further provide solutions for teaching...), tutorials, lecture notes? > > Thanks in advance! > > -Walalal > >
Being slightly cynical, I tend to think that most new cutting edge stuff is usually rediscovered old stuff with some new twists. If I had your assignment, I would look at the historical origins of Golay codes. I remember reading about this long ago in a Proceedings of the IEEE article.
On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 13:17:09 -0500, Stan Pawlukiewicz
<stanp@nospam_mitre.org> wrote:

>walala wrote: >> Dear all, >> >> In a course error control coding, we've assigned project to write a report >> on coding... the project is a little "strange" that we need to simulate that >> we are teachers who need to prepare problems and solutions and also slides >> for teaching these topics. We are complete free in which topic to choose... >> but can you give me some suggestions which topic to choose? Space-time >> coding, LDPC, or else? I don't have any knowledge for these now and I am >> expected to be able to present/teach the topic I've chosen. Could you please >> give some suggestions? On which topic to choose which one is better, where >> to find resources for slides and problems/solutions(these are quite new >> topics, so I really cannot find textbook on these, not to say find problems >> and further provide solutions for teaching...), tutorials, lecture notes? >> >> Thanks in advance! >> >> -Walalal > >Being slightly cynical, I tend to think that most new cutting edge stuff >is usually rediscovered old stuff with some new twists. If I had your >assignment, I would look at the historical origins of Golay codes. I >remember reading about this long ago in a Proceedings of the IEEE article.
In this case Stan is more on target than he may realize. LDPC codes, while certainly the topic of much current research, have been around since 1963 (Dr. Gallagher's thesis). They've been "rediscovered" since the development of Turbo Codes renewed interest in iterative decoding. Space-time codes are newer as far as I can tell, but I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out that they've been around a long time, too. Eric Jacobsen Minister of Algorithms, Intel Corp. My opinions may not be Intel's opinions. http://www.ericjacobsen.org
eric.jacobsen@delete.ieee.org (Eric Jacobsen) wrote in message news:<3fa33549.356588000@news.west.earthlink.net>...
> On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 13:17:09 -0500, Stan Pawlukiewicz > <stanp@nospam_mitre.org> wrote: > > >walala wrote: > >> Dear all, > >> > >> In a course error control coding, we've assigned project to write a report > >> on coding... the project is a little "strange" that we need to simulate that > >> we are teachers who need to prepare problems and solutions and also slides > >> for teaching these topics. We are complete free in which topic to choose... > >> but can you give me some suggestions which topic to choose? Space-time > >> coding, LDPC, or else? I don't have any knowledge for these now and I am > >> expected to be able to present/teach the topic I've chosen. Could you please > >> give some suggestions? On which topic to choose which one is better, where > >> to find resources for slides and problems/solutions(these are quite new > >> topics, so I really cannot find textbook on these, not to say find problems > >> and further provide solutions for teaching...), tutorials, lecture notes? > >> > >> Thanks in advance! > >> > >> -Walalal > > > >Being slightly cynical, I tend to think that most new cutting edge stuff > >is usually rediscovered old stuff with some new twists. If I had your > >assignment, I would look at the historical origins of Golay codes. I > >remember reading about this long ago in a Proceedings of the IEEE article. > > In this case Stan is more on target than he may realize. LDPC codes, > while certainly the topic of much current research, have been around > since 1963 (Dr. Gallagher's thesis).
Hi Eric, I think Professor Robert G. Gallager(Not Gallagher!!) published his thesis at MIT on 1960. The thesis paper "Low density parity check" can be bought online (softcopy).It seems it is very useful for those who want to carry further development or research. I guess, because of simpler HW implemention it is edging over turbo codes - though .. Cheers, Santosh They've been "rediscovered"
> since the development of Turbo Codes renewed interest in iterative > decoding. > > Space-time codes are newer as far as I can tell, but I wouldn't be > surprised if it turned out that they've been around a long time, too. > > > Eric Jacobsen > Minister of Algorithms, Intel Corp. > My opinions may not be Intel's opinions. > http://www.ericjacobsen.org
On Sat, 1 Nov 2003, santosh nath wrote:

> Hi Eric, > I think Professor Robert G. Gallager(Not Gallagher!!) published his
even the MIT display in the infinite corridor spelled it Gallagher instead of Gallager for a long time. it was only after i pointed it out to the people in charge that they fixed it. i think eric actually saw the old, misspelled version when he visited MIT some time back.
> thesis at MIT on 1960. The thesis paper "Low density parity check" can > be bought online (softcopy).It seems it is very useful for those who
theses.mit.edu has almost all published theses from MIT, available for a fee. you can get online previews too, which is neat.
> want to carry further development or research. I guess, because of > simpler HW implemention it is edging over turbo codes - though .. > > Cheers, > Santosh >
-- The most rigorous proofs will be shown by vigorous handwaving. http://www.mit.edu/~kusuma opinion of author is not necessarily of the institute
Julius Kusuma <kusuma@mit.edu> wrote in message news:<Pine.GSO.4.55L.0311011535060.14963@all-night-tool.mit.edu>...
> On Sat, 1 Nov 2003, santosh nath wrote: > > > Hi Eric, > > I think Professor Robert G. Gallager(Not Gallagher!!) published his > > even the MIT display in the infinite corridor spelled it Gallagher instead > of Gallager for a long time. it was only after i pointed it out to the > people in charge that they fixed it. i think eric actually saw the old, > misspelled version when he visited MIT some time back. > > > thesis at MIT on 1960. The thesis paper "Low density parity check" can > > be bought online (softcopy).It seems it is very useful for those who > > theses.mit.edu has almost all published theses from MIT, available for a > fee. you can get online previews too, which is neat.
WoW ! Even Dave Forney's famous "Concatenated Codes" is there. Any more famous works in these archives. Sachin
On Mon, 3 Nov 2003, Sachin Gupta wrote:

> Julius Kusuma <kusuma@mit.edu> wrote in message news:<Pine.GSO.4.55L.0311011535060.14963@all-night-tool.mit.edu>... > > On Sat, 1 Nov 2003, santosh nath wrote: > > > > > Hi Eric, > > > I think Professor Robert G. Gallager(Not Gallagher!!) published his > > > > even the MIT display in the infinite corridor spelled it Gallagher instead > > of Gallager for a long time. it was only after i pointed it out to the > > people in charge that they fixed it. i think eric actually saw the old, > > misspelled version when he visited MIT some time back. > > > > > thesis at MIT on 1960. The thesis paper "Low density parity check" can > > > be bought online (softcopy).It seems it is very useful for those who > > > > theses.mit.edu has almost all published theses from MIT, available for a > > fee. you can get online previews too, which is neat. > > WoW ! Even Dave Forney's famous "Concatenated Codes" is there. Any > more famous works in these archives. > > Sachin >
sure, you can take a look at shannon's MS and PhD theses, among others. it's nearly complete, so if it was done at MIT most likely it is available from that website. julius -- The most rigorous proofs will be shown by vigorous handwaving. http://www.mit.edu/~kusuma opinion of author is not necessarily of the institute