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Blackfin programming

Started by kathy September 21, 2004
Where I can find how to write assembly in Blackfin? For example,
functions, procedures, etc. The Blackfin instruction manual ONLY show
the instruction set.

Any free documents / resource available?
kathy wrote:
> Where I can find how to write assembly in Blackfin? For example, > functions, procedures, etc. The Blackfin instruction manual ONLY show > the instruction set. > > Any free documents / resource available?
Once you know the instruction set, about the only thing left is knowing how to put the instructions together to do useful stuff. Check ADI's web site for app notes containing example code. I think they also have an assembly manual online somewhere, and that'll explain the assembler directives (.segment, etc). -- Jim Thomas Principal Applications Engineer Bittware, Inc jthomas@bittware.com http://www.bittware.com (603) 226-0404 x536 Nothing is ever so bad that it can't get worse. - Calvin
kathy wrote:

> Where I can find how to write assembly in Blackfin? For example, > functions, procedures, etc. The Blackfin instruction manual ONLY show > the instruction set. > > Any free documents / resource available?
Kathy, My first logic designs were combinations of gates and flip-flops made from discrete components. Later, I used ICs. Soon more complex components became available, including counters, multiplexers, and the like. I got good at stringing together combinations of logic devices to accomplish what was needed. When it became feasible to use microprocessors to do some of those jobs, assembly language was the most practical way to program them. It was not a big step away from designing with gates and other functions. Where before I strung ICs together, now I cascaded op codes. The assembly language manual is a list of available operations. Design consists of arranging them to accomplish what is needed. Just as with a family of logic devices there are pieces of cleverness that make construction easier, so with any processor architecture there are clever tricks peculiar to it. Briefly, you decide what you need to, take stock of the resources available, and do it. Nevertheless, I understand your desire for examples and canned functions. The best way to learn to write well is to read the works of good writers. That applies to fiction as well as to programming, and to different programming languages separately. The actual benefit from using canned functions may be less than that from reading them and understanding their subtleties. Jerry _____________________________________ * No computed jump? Push the address onto the stack and execute RTS. -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������

Jerry Avins wrote:

(snip)

> * No computed jump? Push the address onto the stack and execute RTS.
For the 6502, push (address-1) onto the stack and RTS. I saw it once in some code and had to go look at the manual to see why. -- glen