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Programmable Timer with DSP/BIOS

Started by Simone Winkler January 15, 2005
jim wrote:

> > Jerry Avins wrote:
>> The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I >>concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump >>around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had >>left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. >> > > And that would be why the car wouldn't start..No? > > -jim
Exactly. That was my point. What did you think it was? Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������

Jerry Avins wrote:
> > jim wrote: > > > > > Jerry Avins wrote: > > >> The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I > >>concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump > >>around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had > >>left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. > >> > > > > And that would be why the car wouldn't start..No? > > > > -jim > > Exactly. That was my point. What did you think it was?
Well, your stated point was "Interlocks have their place." But the story seems to contradict that, since you were unaware of any interlock. The moral of the story as far as I can see is that you should not leave the key in the ignition when stopping and leaving the car. At least that would be the automakers defense had you come to harm. -jim ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
jim wrote:

> > Jerry Avins wrote: > >>jim wrote: >> >> >>>Jerry Avins wrote: >> >>>> The lights showed I had plenty of battery, so I >>>>concluded ice in the starter relay. I used a pair of pliers to jump >>>>around the relay and the car started right up ... and took off. I had >>>>left it in gear, and by going under the hood, defeated the interlock. >>>> >>> >>>And that would be why the car wouldn't start..No? >>> >>>-jim >> >>Exactly. That was my point. What did you think it was? > > > Well, your stated point was "Interlocks have their place." But the story > seems to contradict that, since you were unaware of any interlock. The > moral of the story as far as I can see is that you should not leave the > key in the ignition when stopping and leaving the car. At least that > would be the automakers defense had you come to harm. > > -jim > > > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups > ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
I never leave the key in the ignition unless I use my spare key to lock the doors. I do that only when warming the car, usually in my driveway. In that car, a middle-50s Dodge, there was no mechanism to capture the key in the lock or to lock the steering wheel when the key was removed. Too many interlocks can be a detriment. Cars nowadays have an interlock override to allow the transmission to get out of park without the key. A guy I knew of washed out of flight school when he landed his trainer without putting the wheels down. There was a warning horn that sounded in the headset if the flaps were put down while the wheels were up. His flight instructor was livid: "Didn't you hear us yelling at you to put the wheels down?" His answer: "I couldn't hear _anything_ with that damn horn in my ears!" Interlocks need to be well thought out. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������

Jerry Avins wrote:

> > I never leave the key in the ignition unless I use my spare key to lock > the doors. I do that only when warming the car, usually in my driveway. > In that car, a middle-50s Dodge, there was no mechanism to capture the > key in the lock or to lock the steering wheel when the key was removed. >
That was one of those push button transmission. I'm pretty sure by the 50's automatics were required by federal afety regulations to have a positve stop (parking pawl) when the car was off and the key removed. I don't remember how that was implemented with those push button transmissions. -jim ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---