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In memoriam - Vladimir Vassilevsky

Started by Rick Lyons July 25, 2015
On 7/26/2015 11:47 AM, gyansorova@gmail.com wrote:
> On Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 9:41:35 PM UTC+12, Rick Lyons wrote: >> Hi, >> In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally >> remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days >> after the day of their passing. Today it's been 40 >> days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left this world. >> >> My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that >> he was a highly skilled engineer. Over the years of >> exchanging signal processing ideas with Vlad I had the >> distinct impression that he knew more about signal >> processing than I did. That made our relationship >> beneficial to me. One thing was clear, he had far more >> practical signal processing implementation experience >> than I had. >> >> Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp >> Conference in Kansas city. I helped him organize the >> conference but he and his wife Lena, by far, did the bulk >> of the work to make the conference a success. (Vladimir >> was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad and Lena >> graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their >> home for dinner the night before the conference started. >> >> In the evening of the first day of the conference Vlad >> arranged for the attendees to have dinner together in a >> private back room of a local Chinese restaurant. Vlad >> knew that the restaurant did not have a license to sell >> beer, but he did not let that stop him. Five minutes after >> we all sat down in our private room three 12-packs of >> Heineken beer were magically delivered to us through >> the back door of the restaurant. Ha ha. I could see >> that Vlad certainly was a "problem solving" kinda guy. >> >> Vladimir also had the good sense of humor--he told me >> one of my favorite adult jokes. Unless someone asks me, >> I won't repeat the joke here for fear of offending >> sensitive feminine ears. >> >> I'll miss Vladimir. >> >> "I remember those happy days and often wish I could >> speak into the ears of the dead the gratitude which >> was due to them in life and so ill-returned." >> --Gwyn Thomas >> >> [-Rick-] > > Was that the guy who used to reply Stupindo to every question? Or am I mixing him up with somebody else?
You got the guy but the quote is not quite right. "Stupident", intended to flag the obvious student asking someone to do his homework I believe or just "stupid" questions in general. I think this aspect of Vlad was as much his presence in this group as any of his technical comments. Regardless of whether you appreciated it or not, it was Vlad and is part of his legacy. -- Rick
On Sun, 26 Jul 2015 08:47:39 -0700, gyansorova wrote:

> On Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 9:41:35 PM UTC+12, Rick Lyons wrote: >> Hi, >> In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally >> remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days after the day of >> their passing. Today it's been 40 days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left >> this world. >> >> My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that he was a highly >> skilled engineer. Over the years of exchanging signal processing ideas >> with Vlad I had the distinct impression that he knew more about signal >> processing than I did. That made our relationship beneficial to me. >> One thing was clear, he had far more practical signal processing >> implementation experience than I had. >> >> Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp Conference in >> Kansas city. I helped him organize the conference but he and his wife >> Lena, by far, did the bulk of the work to make the conference a >> success. (Vladimir was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad and >> Lena graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their home for >> dinner the night before the conference started. >> >> In the evening of the first day of the conference Vlad arranged for the >> attendees to have dinner together in a private back room of a local >> Chinese restaurant. Vlad knew that the restaurant did not have a >> license to sell beer, but he did not let that stop him. Five minutes >> after we all sat down in our private room three 12-packs of Heineken >> beer were magically delivered to us through the back door of the >> restaurant. Ha ha. I could see that Vlad certainly was a "problem >> solving" kinda guy. >> >> Vladimir also had the good sense of humor--he told me one of my >> favorite adult jokes. Unless someone asks me, >> I won't repeat the joke here for fear of offending sensitive feminine >> ears. >> >> I'll miss Vladimir. >> >> "I remember those happy days and often wish I could >> speak into the ears of the dead the gratitude which was due to them >> in life and so ill-returned." >> --Gwyn Thomas >> >> [-Rick-] > > Was that the guy who used to reply Stupindo to every question? Or am I > mixing him up with somebody else?
"Stupident", which started out as a short-hand for "you would know this if you studied harder" but which he started overusing as time went on. When he started here he was exceedingly helpful, but something made him get bitter. I'm choosing to remember him in his helpful mode, and wishing that he had lived long enough to find it again. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com
Tim Wescott  <seemywebsite@myfooter.really> wrote:

>"Stupident", which started out as a short-hand for "you would know this >if you studied harder" but which he started overusing as time went on. >When he started here he was exceedingly helpful, but something made him >get bitter.
I don't actually know Vlad was feeling "bitter" when he wrote this stuff. I would rather suppose he was comfortably in his element. Of the many times I disagreed with him, ultimately he was most often in the right. And he could also be quite... elegant when in agreement. I recall once discussing the superiority of a superhet receiver architecture, relative to direct conversion, and he concurred by stating direct conversion was the "shit architecture". (And he was not using "shit" in the positive, ghetto sense....) Steve
On Monday, July 27, 2015 at 9:18:51 AM UTC+12, Tim Wescott wrote:
> On Sun, 26 Jul 2015 08:47:39 -0700, gyansorova wrote: > > > On Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 9:41:35 PM UTC+12, Rick Lyons wrote: > >> Hi, > >> In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally > >> remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days after the day of > >> their passing. Today it's been 40 days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left > >> this world. > >> > >> My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that he was a highly > >> skilled engineer. Over the years of exchanging signal processing ideas > >> with Vlad I had the distinct impression that he knew more about signal > >> processing than I did. That made our relationship beneficial to me. > >> One thing was clear, he had far more practical signal processing > >> implementation experience than I had. > >> > >> Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp Conference in > >> Kansas city. I helped him organize the conference but he and his wife > >> Lena, by far, did the bulk of the work to make the conference a > >> success. (Vladimir was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad and > >> Lena graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their home for > >> dinner the night before the conference started. > >> > >> In the evening of the first day of the conference Vlad arranged for the > >> attendees to have dinner together in a private back room of a local > >> Chinese restaurant. Vlad knew that the restaurant did not have a > >> license to sell beer, but he did not let that stop him. Five minutes > >> after we all sat down in our private room three 12-packs of Heineken > >> beer were magically delivered to us through the back door of the > >> restaurant. Ha ha. I could see that Vlad certainly was a "problem > >> solving" kinda guy. > >> > >> Vladimir also had the good sense of humor--he told me one of my > >> favorite adult jokes. Unless someone asks me, > >> I won't repeat the joke here for fear of offending sensitive feminine > >> ears. > >> > >> I'll miss Vladimir. > >> > >> "I remember those happy days and often wish I could > >> speak into the ears of the dead the gratitude which was due to them > >> in life and so ill-returned." > >> --Gwyn Thomas > >> > >> [-Rick-] > > > > Was that the guy who used to reply Stupindo to every question? Or am I > > mixing him up with somebody else? > > "Stupident", which started out as a short-hand for "you would know this > if you studied harder" but which he started overusing as time went on. > When he started here he was exceedingly helpful, but something made him > get bitter. > > I'm choosing to remember him in his helpful mode, and wishing that he had > lived long enough to find it again. > > -- > > Tim Wescott > Wescott Design Services > http://www.wescottdesign.com
One should not speak ill of the dead I suppose, but I never saw a single comment of his that was not abusive. I must have caught him nearer the twilight of his career. For what good is all the specialised knowledge in the world if you are now prepared to share it.
 >For what good is all the specialised knowledge in the world if you are not 
> prepared to share it.
or not properly compensated for it? or is knowledge supposed to be it's own reward? Mark
On 07/27/2015 05:18 AM, Tim Wescott wrote:
> "Stupident", which started out as a short-hand for "you would know this > if you studied harder" but which he started overusing as time went on. > When he started here he was exceedingly helpful, but something made him > get bitter. > > I'm choosing to remember him in his helpful mode, and wishing that he had > lived long enough to find it again.
I few of his comments concurring with things I had posted seemed to indicate some disillusionment with the tedious crap you have to do between interesting pieces of work. Although annoying and arrogant at times, he was definitely one of the good guys. Steve
On Tuesday, July 28, 2015 at 1:11:14 AM UTC+12, mako...@yahoo.com wrote:
> >For what good is all the specialised knowledge in the world if you are not > > prepared to share it. > > > or not properly compensated for it? > > or is knowledge supposed to be it's own reward? > > > Mark
That is how or great human data base of knowledge is built. It's not just about textbooks. If it were we would rarely get past stage one. If you experienced engineers are not prepared to give freely the fruits of your knowledge then mankind has no hope. Best wishes.
On Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 5:41:35 AM UTC-4, Rick Lyons wrote:
> Hi, > In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally > remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days > after the day of their passing. Today it's been 40 > days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left this world. > > My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that > he was a highly skilled engineer. Over the years of > exchanging signal processing ideas with Vlad I had the > distinct impression that he knew more about signal > processing than I did. That made our relationship > beneficial to me. One thing was clear, he had far more > practical signal processing implementation experience > than I had. > > Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp > Conference in Kansas city. I helped him organize the > conference but he and his wife Lena, by far, did the bulk > of the work to make the conference a success. (Vladimir > was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad and Lena > graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their > home for dinner the night before the conference started. > > In the evening of the first day of the conference Vlad > arranged for the attendees to have dinner together in a > private back room of a local Chinese restaurant. Vlad > knew that the restaurant did not have a license to sell > beer, but he did not let that stop him. Five minutes after > we all sat down in our private room three 12-packs of > Heineken beer were magically delivered to us through > the back door of the restaurant. Ha ha. I could see > that Vlad certainly was a "problem solving" kinda guy. > > Vladimir also had the good sense of humor--he told me > one of my favorite adult jokes. Unless someone asks me, > I won't repeat the joke here for fear of offending > sensitive feminine ears. > > I'll miss Vladimir. > > "I remember those happy days and often wish I could > speak into the ears of the dead the gratitude which > was due to them in life and so ill-returned." > --Gwyn Thomas > > [-Rick-]
I wish his wife and family peace in the certain difficult days ahead. I have been in his wife's shoes myself perhaps even under similar circumstances. Vlad's posts were not impressive to me, but I do not judge people by their internet postings. I am sure I would have enjoyed him as a neighbor or co-worker. Clearly he was a very talented guy.
On 7/25/15 5:41 AM, Rick Lyons wrote:
> > In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally > remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days > after the day of their passing. Today it's been 40 > days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left this world. > > My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that > he was a highly skilled engineer. Over the years of > exchanging signal processing ideas with Vlad I had the > distinct impression that he knew more about signal > processing than I did. That made our relationship > beneficial to me. One thing was clear, he had far more > practical signal processing implementation experience > than I had. > > Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp > Conference in Kansas city. I helped him organize the > conference but he and his wife Lena, by far, did the bulk > of the work to make the conference a success. (Vladimir > was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad and Lena > graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their > home for dinner the night before the conference started. >
dunno what to say about Vlad. he was both very competent *when* he wanted to disclose technique. and he was often rude (gee, nobody ever said that about me...). actually, i was only reactive to Vlad's rudeness a couple times. often i agreed with him about some of the Stupidents. (but i choose different ways to lock horns with people on public forums.) i really regret not coming to the 2010 comp.dsp conference (or the 2004 comp.dsp conference at Al Clark's place). Vlad even wrote me and invited me (and i heard Jerry) to stay in his house. dunno how Lena felt about that. about moments like these, i can only remember is that all's we are is the cry of a child. God bless Lena and family. and bring them peace. -- r b-j rbj@audioimagination.com "Imagination is more important than knowledge."
On Wednesday, July 29, 2015 at 6:07:53 AM UTC+12, robert bristow-johnson wrote:
> On 7/25/15 5:41 AM, Rick Lyons wrote: > > > > In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally > > remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days > > after the day of their passing. Today it's been 40 > > days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left this world. > > > > My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that > > he was a highly skilled engineer. Over the years of > > exchanging signal processing ideas with Vlad I had the > > distinct impression that he knew more about signal > > processing than I did. That made our relationship > > beneficial to me. One thing was clear, he had far more > > practical signal processing implementation experience > > than I had. > > > > Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp > > Conference in Kansas city. I helped him organize the > > conference but he and his wife Lena, by far, did the bulk > > of the work to make the conference a success. (Vladimir > > was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad and Lena > > graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their > > home for dinner the night before the conference started. > > > > dunno what to say about Vlad. he was both very competent *when* he > wanted to disclose technique. and he was often rude (gee, nobody ever > said that about me...). actually, i was only reactive to Vlad's > rudeness a couple times. often i agreed with him about some of the > Stupidents. (but i choose different ways to lock horns with people on > public forums.) > > i really regret not coming to the 2010 comp.dsp conference (or the 2004 > comp.dsp conference at Al Clark's place). Vlad even wrote me and > invited me (and i heard Jerry) to stay in his house. dunno how Lena > felt about that. > > about moments like these, i can only remember is that all's we are is > the cry of a child. God bless Lena and family. and bring them peace. > > -- > > r b-j rbj@audioimagination.com > > "Imagination is more important than knowledge."
The thing I cannot understand is why some people who clearly hate disseminating knowledge even bother to be on NGs like this. Surely if you know you are of no help then why bother! Todays students are tomorrows engineers and we all did daft things when we were young.