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In memoriam - Vladimir Vassilevsky

Started by Rick Lyons July 25, 2015
On 7/28/15 2:10 PM, gyansorova@gmail.com wrote:
> On Wednesday, July 29, 2015 at 6:07:53 AM UTC+12, robert bristow-johnson wrote: >> >> dunno what to say about Vlad. he was both very competent *when* he >> wanted to disclose technique. and he was often rude (gee, nobody ever >> said that about me...). actually, i was only reactive to Vlad's >> rudeness a couple times. often i agreed with him about some of the >> Stupidents. (but i choose different ways to lock horns with people on >> public forums.) > > The thing I cannot understand is why some people who clearly hate disseminating knowledge even bother to be on NGs like this. Surely if you know you are of no help then why bother! Todays students are tomorrows engineers and we all did daft things when we were young.
well, what would be better (for me) than disseminating knowledge for free is to get paid for it. i long ago gave up on that prospect (if i think the information rightfully belongs to someone else, like a former employer, i'll be more mum about it). dunno if Vlad ever did. -- r b-j rbj@audioimagination.com "Imagination is more important than knowledge."
On Tue, 28 Jul 2015 11:10:49 -0700, gyansorova wrote:

> On Wednesday, July 29, 2015 at 6:07:53 AM UTC+12, robert bristow-johnson > wrote: >> On 7/25/15 5:41 AM, Rick Lyons wrote: >> > >> > In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally >> > remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days after the day >> > of their passing. Today it's been 40 days since Vladimir Vassilevsky >> > left this world. >> > >> > My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that he was a highly >> > skilled engineer. Over the years of exchanging signal processing >> > ideas with Vlad I had the distinct impression that he knew more about >> > signal processing than I did. That made our relationship beneficial >> > to me. One thing was clear, he had far more practical signal >> > processing implementation experience than I had. >> > >> > Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp Conference >> > in Kansas city. I helped him organize the conference but he and his >> > wife Lena, by far, did the bulk of the work to make the conference a >> > success. (Vladimir was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad >> > and Lena graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their home >> > for dinner the night before the conference started. >> > >> > >> dunno what to say about Vlad. he was both very competent *when* he >> wanted to disclose technique. and he was often rude (gee, nobody ever >> said that about me...). actually, i was only reactive to Vlad's >> rudeness a couple times. often i agreed with him about some of the >> Stupidents. (but i choose different ways to lock horns with people on >> public forums.) >> >> i really regret not coming to the 2010 comp.dsp conference (or the 2004 >> comp.dsp conference at Al Clark's place). Vlad even wrote me and >> invited me (and i heard Jerry) to stay in his house. dunno how Lena >> felt about that. >> >> about moments like these, i can only remember is that all's we are is >> the cry of a child. God bless Lena and family. and bring them peace. >> >> -- >> >> r b-j rbj@audioimagination.com >> >> "Imagination is more important than knowledge." > > The thing I cannot understand is why some people who clearly hate > disseminating knowledge even bother to be on NGs like this. Surely if > you know you are of no help then why bother! Todays students are > tomorrows engineers and we all did daft things when we were young.
I had a very different read of The Impaler than you. The times when I brought a question to the group I never got anything but legitimate attempts to help me solve my problem, and not "Just pay me." He just took it as an insult when people couldn't be bothered to do any preliminary Googling or clearly define what it was they were trying to do. And, frankly, it is. "Hey help me with this, I can't even be bothered to clear the red underlined spelling errors." is an ask for your time from someone not willing to spend their own. He just responded to those insults abrasively, rather than simply ignore them. VV took a real joy in being a pain in the ass. He'd happily say so. But respect got respect. He was a gracious host for comp.dsp 2010 and always a damn fine engineer. -- Rob Gaddi, Highland Technology -- www.highlandtechnology.com Email address domain is currently out of order. See above to fix.
robert bristow-johnson  <rbj@audioimagination.com> wrote:

>On 7/28/15 2:10 PM, gyansorova@gmail.com wrote:
>> The thing I cannot understand is why some people who clearly hate >> disseminating knowledge even bother to be on NGs like this. Surely if >> you know you are of no help then why bother! Todays students are >> tomorrows engineers and we all did daft things when we were young.
>well, what would be better (for me) than disseminating knowledge for >free is to get paid for it. i long ago gave up on that prospect (if i >think the information rightfully belongs to someone else, like a former >employer, i'll be more mum about it). dunno if Vlad ever did.
A newsgroup conversation is so far removed from being a paid consulting situation that I think trying to view the former in the context of the latter is ridiculous. I understand the need to not want to help students with their homework, but I have no problem with, and in fact enjoy, helping beginners with their engineering problems. I had a maddening experience once over on sci.math, in a situation wherein I asked about a problem which I described abstractly, but in reallity involved how best to assign center frequencies to access points; and which happened to involve the "Law of the Excluded Middle", a basic theorem from combinatorics. The members of the newsgroup must have figured I was doing a homework problem, because they did not want to fully answer my question, instead giving vague hints followed by "you should be able to figure it out from there". Problem is, while I do have a degree in math and took a course in combinatorics, that was 40 years ago and I was pretty much in the dark as far as applying the theorem to my problem. I felt like a Stupident. Steve
On 7/28/2015 2:49 PM, Steve Pope wrote:
> robert bristow-johnson <rbj@audioimagination.com> wrote: > >> On 7/28/15 2:10 PM, gyansorova@gmail.com wrote: > >>> The thing I cannot understand is why some people who clearly hate >>> disseminating knowledge even bother to be on NGs like this. Surely if >>> you know you are of no help then why bother! Todays students are >>> tomorrows engineers and we all did daft things when we were young. > >> well, what would be better (for me) than disseminating knowledge for >> free is to get paid for it. i long ago gave up on that prospect (if i >> think the information rightfully belongs to someone else, like a former >> employer, i'll be more mum about it). dunno if Vlad ever did. > > A newsgroup conversation is so far removed from being a paid > consulting situation that I think trying to view the former > in the context of the latter is ridiculous.
There can be a certain amount of overlap. I have had more than one consulting contact through the newsgroups. Heck, once I was giving free advice hoping it might turn into a design job but no. Then the guy I was helping out got his boss to send me a check for $500.
> Problem is, while I do have a degree in math and took a course > in combinatorics, that was 40 years ago and I was pretty much > in the dark as far as applying the theorem to my problem. > > I felt like a Stupident.
That is often a problem from working for a company where you can be pigeonholed. Some years later you find much of your education fuzzy and some totally missing. I got an A in abstract algebra but can remember little other than my one math joke. -- Rick
On Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 5:41:35 AM UTC-4, Rick Lyons wrote:
> Hi, > In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally > remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days > after the day of their passing. Today it's been 40 > days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left this world. > > My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that > he was a highly skilled engineer. Over the years of > exchanging signal processing ideas with Vlad I had the > distinct impression that he knew more about signal > processing than I did. That made our relationship > beneficial to me. One thing was clear, he had far more > practical signal processing implementation experience > than I had. > > Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp > Conference in Kansas city. I helped him organize the > conference but he and his wife Lena, by far, did the bulk > of the work to make the conference a success. (Vladimir > was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad and Lena > graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their > home for dinner the night before the conference started. > > In the evening of the first day of the conference Vlad > arranged for the attendees to have dinner together in a > private back room of a local Chinese restaurant. Vlad > knew that the restaurant did not have a license to sell > beer, but he did not let that stop him. Five minutes after > we all sat down in our private room three 12-packs of > Heineken beer were magically delivered to us through > the back door of the restaurant. Ha ha. I could see > that Vlad certainly was a "problem solving" kinda guy. > > Vladimir also had the good sense of humor--he told me > one of my favorite adult jokes. Unless someone asks me, > I won't repeat the joke here for fear of offending > sensitive feminine ears. > > I'll miss Vladimir. > > "I remember those happy days and often wish I could > speak into the ears of the dead the gratitude which > was due to them in life and so ill-returned." > --Gwyn Thomas > > [-Rick-]
Vlad was a libertarian, left or right-wing - i don't remember, but the kind that opposes patents and other types of intellectual property. Strange fellow coming from a former communist state to a capitalistic world driven by profits. At least he doesn't have to fight anymore with corporate bullies and unpaying customers, unlike the rest of us RIP
>Hi, > In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally >remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days >after the day of their passing. Today it's been 40 >days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left this world. > >My memory of Vlad, as his friends called him, is that >he was a highly skilled engineer. Over the years of >exchanging signal processing ideas with Vlad I had the >distinct impression that he knew more about signal >processing than I did. That made our relationship >beneficial to me. One thing was clear, he had far more >practical signal processing implementation experience >than I had. > >Vladimir had the original idea to have the 2010 Comp.dsp >Conference in Kansas city. I helped him organize the >conference but he and his wife Lena, by far, did the bulk >of the work to make the conference a success. (Vladimir >was NOT a lazy guy.) In addition to that Vlad and Lena >graciously welcomed the conference attendees into their >home for dinner the night before the conference started. > >In the evening of the first day of the conference Vlad >arranged for the attendees to have dinner together in a >private back room of a local Chinese restaurant. Vlad >knew that the restaurant did not have a license to sell >beer, but he did not let that stop him. Five minutes after >we all sat down in our private room three 12-packs of >Heineken beer were magically delivered to us through >the back door of the restaurant. Ha ha. I could see >that Vlad certainly was a "problem solving" kinda guy. > >Vladimir also had the good sense of humor--he told me >one of my favorite adult jokes. Unless someone asks me, >I won't repeat the joke here for fear of offending >sensitive feminine ears. > >I'll miss Vladimir. > > "I remember those happy days and often wish I could > speak into the ears of the dead the gratitude which > was due to them in life and so ill-returned." > --Gwyn Thomas > >[-Rick-]
1) What was the cause of his passing? 2) How old was he? --------------------------------------- Posted through http://www.DSPRelated.com
On 7/25/2015 5:41 AM, Rick Lyons wrote:
> > Hi, > In the Russian culture it's traditional to formally > remember a deceased family member, or friend, 40 days > after the day of their passing. Today it's been 40 > days since Vladimir Vassilevsky left this world.
I just noticed this post - I had corresponded with Mr. Vassilevsky a few times regarding circuits on sci.electronics.design, and even built a few of his designs including this one (though the schematic is gone now) http://www.abvolt.com/misc/antiseptic.jpg He seemed extremely talented and will surely be missed.
He is not dead 
On Thursday, May 24, 2018 at 1:00:10 PM UTC+12, bauergr...@gmail.com wrote:
> He is not dead
I suspected this all along. I assume he is Undead and walks the earth at night