Laurel or Yanny

Started by Randy Yates May 20, 2018
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanny_or_Laurel

Is this for real? All I hear is unambiguously "Laurel."

Are there any objective, scientific analyses exploring this
(alleged) ambiguity?
-- 
Randy Yates, DSP/Embedded Firmware Developer
Digital Signal Labs
http://www.digitalsignallabs.com
On 2018-05-20 23:04, Randy Yates wrote:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanny_or_Laurel > > Is this for real? All I hear is unambiguously "Laurel." > > Are there any objective, scientific analyses exploring this > (alleged) ambiguity?
I think it is quite well explained in the wikipedia link you posted. Like there are opticall illusions, there are acustical too. bye, -- piergiorgio
On Monday, May 21, 2018 at 9:04:49 AM UTC+12, Randy Yates wrote:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanny_or_Laurel > > Is this for real? All I hear is unambiguously "Laurel." > > Are there any objective, scientific analyses exploring this > (alleged) ambiguity? > -- > Randy Yates, DSP/Embedded Firmware Developer > Digital Signal Labs > http://www.digitalsignallabs.com
Brainstorm or Green Needle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXxV2C1ri2k
Piergiorgio Sartor  <piergiorgio.sartor.this.should.not.be.used@nexgo.REMOVETHIS.de>
wrote:

>On 2018-05-20 23:04, Randy Yates wrote:
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanny_or_Laurel
>> Is this for real? All I hear is unambiguously "Laurel."
>> Are there any objective, scientific analyses exploring this >> (alleged) ambiguity? > >I think it is quite well explained in the wikipedia link you posted. > >Like there are opticall illusions, there are acustical too.
It's a good wikipedia entry, however I suspect one could do a deep dive into human aquisition of phoneme recognition and how it drives this illusion. Perhaps there's a correlation with where and when one acquired one's English language, or other first language. Tangentially I now know why (some) opera singers pronounce Italian in a strange manner .. they're working from phonetic spellings... S.
Piergiorgio Sartor
<piergiorgio.sartor.this.should.not.be.used@nexgo.REMOVETHIS.de> writes:

> On 2018-05-20 23:04, Randy Yates wrote: >> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanny_or_Laurel >> >> Is this for real? All I hear is unambiguously "Laurel." >> >> Are there any objective, scientific analyses exploring this >> (alleged) ambiguity? > > I think it is quite well explained in the wikipedia link you posted.
The article provides suggestions and comparisons with optical illusions in the scientific analysis section. That isn't my idea of "well-explained." -- Randy Yates, DSP/Embedded Firmware Developer Digital Signal Labs http://www.digitalsignallabs.com
Randy Yates  <yates@digitalsignallabs.com> wrote:

>Piergiorgio Sartor
>> I think it is quite well explained in the wikipedia link you posted.
>The article provides suggestions and comparisons with optical illusions >in the scientific analysis section.
>That isn't my idea of "well-explained."
Well, Wikipedia editors can't do their own analysis so they are limited in that sense. Were someone to publish a better analysis, then that could be included in the Wiki page. It is ripe for more analysis, and possibly even applications. (Some sort of "code-talking" comes to mind.) Steve
On 2018-05-21 03:44, Randy Yates wrote:
[...]
> The article provides suggestions and comparisons with optical illusions > in the scientific analysis section. > > That isn't my idea of "well-explained."
It seems to me there are several links to different level of explanations. In any case, what is your idea of "well-explained", when we talk about *optical* illusions? bye, -- piergiorgio
Le dimanche 20 mai 2018 17:04:49 UTC-4, Randy Yates a &eacute;crit&nbsp;:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanny_or_Laurel > > Is this for real? All I hear is unambiguously "Laurel." > > Are there any objective, scientific analyses exploring this > (alleged) ambiguity? > -- > Randy Yates, DSP/Embedded Firmware Developer > Digital Signal Labs > http://www.digitalsignallabs.com
I heard Laurel on the radio then I heard Yanny on youtube. I think it has to do with the frequency response. The FM radio + my car sound system is not ideal for high-frequency sounds. OTOH, my home is quiet and I have a better sound system so I could hear the higher frequencies better.
On Tue, 22 May 2018 05:50:16 -0700 (PDT), benjamin.couillard@gmail.com
wrote:

>Le dimanche 20 mai 2018 17:04:49 UTC-4, Randy Yates a =C3=A9crit=C2=A0: >> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanny_or_Laurel >>=20 >> Is this for real? All I hear is unambiguously "Laurel." >>=20 >> Are there any objective, scientific analyses exploring this >> (alleged) ambiguity? >> --=20 >> Randy Yates, DSP/Embedded Firmware Developer >> Digital Signal Labs >> http://www.digitalsignallabs.com > >I heard Laurel on the radio then I heard Yanny on youtube. I think it has t= >o do with the frequency response. The FM radio + my car sound system is not= > ideal for high-frequency sounds. OTOH, my home is quiet and I have a bette= >r sound system so I could hear the higher frequencies better.
I heard Yanni the very first instance the first time I heard it played repetitively, but Laurel ever since then. Very interesting.
On Sun, 20 May 2018 14:50:19 -0700 (PDT), gyansorova@gmail.com wrote:

>On Monday, May 21, 2018 at 9:04:49 AM UTC+12, Randy Yates wrote: >> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanny_or_Laurel >> >> Is this for real? All I hear is unambiguously "Laurel." >> >> Are there any objective, scientific analyses exploring this >> (alleged) ambiguity? >> -- >> Randy Yates, DSP/Embedded Firmware Developer >> Digital Signal Labs >> http://www.digitalsignallabs.com > >Brainstorm or Green Needle > >https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXxV2C1ri2k
I only hear green needle, but it's interesting that that's not what's intended. This seems even stranger since it's a change from two syllables to three.