Forums

Goertzel was named after who?

Started by Unknown January 13, 2006
>> > > Here's a good guess: Dr. Gerald Goertzel >
Thanks! So it was indeed Gerald. I couldn't find his age anywhere and thought that he couldn't possibly have published that famous filter article back in 1958. But it seems he did. Regards, Joerg http://www.analogconsultants.com
"Joerg" ...
> >> > > > > Here's a good guess: Dr. Gerald Goertzel > > > > Thanks! So it was indeed Gerald. I couldn't find his age anywhere and > thought that he couldn't possibly have published that famous filter > article back in 1958. But it seems he did.
Yes, that is the one, see: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9803E4DF1E39F93AA25754C0A9649C8B63 "GOERTZEL-Dr. Gerald. ........, died at the age of 82, July 17, 2002, in his home in White Plains. Dr. Goertzel retired in 1992 from a distinguished career as a computer scientist, nuclear engineer, and physicist, including work on the Manhattan Project, for the Nuclear Development Corporation of America, for Sage Instruments (a company he started to develop scientific instruments for medical research) and for 28 years in IBMs research division where he worked in the areas of design automation, data compression and digital printing technology. Developer of the Goertzel Algorithm and holder of numerous patents, he received his B.S. and M.S. from the Stevens Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from New York University. ...... Regards, Arie de Muynck
Joerg wrote:
>>> >> >> Here's a good guess: Dr. Gerald Goertzel >> > > Thanks! So it was indeed Gerald. I couldn't find his age anywhere and > thought that he couldn't possibly have published that famous filter > article back in 1958. But it seems he did. > > Regards, Joerg > > http://www.analogconsultants.com
Hell, man, if I had been on the ball, I could have published in 1958. That's when my oldest was born. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������
Hello Jerry,

> > Hell, man, if I had been on the ball, I could have published in 1958. > That's when my oldest was born. >
I still needed diapers back then :-) Regards, Joerg http://www.analogconsultants.com
Jerry Avins wrote:

> Joerg wrote: > >>>> >>> >>> Here's a good guess: Dr. Gerald Goertzel >>> >> >> Thanks! So it was indeed Gerald. I couldn't find his age anywhere and >> thought that he couldn't possibly have published that famous filter >> article back in 1958. But it seems he did. >> >> Regards, Joerg >> >> http://www.analogconsultants.com > > > Hell, man, if I had been on the ball, I could have published in 1958. > That's when my oldest was born. > > Jerry
And you had time left over for writing papers? -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com

Tim Wescott wrote:

> And you had time left over for writing papers?
For you younger guys, _TAKE_ that time. That and patents with your name on them are an investment in the future that you can't afford not to make if you wish to remain technical all the way out. I think quite a few of us have learned that the hard way. Bob -- "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no simpler." A. Einstein
Tim Wescott wrote:
> Jerry Avins wrote: > >> Joerg wrote: >> >>>>> >>>> >>>> Here's a good guess: Dr. Gerald Goertzel >>>> >>> >>> Thanks! So it was indeed Gerald. I couldn't find his age anywhere and >>> thought that he couldn't possibly have published that famous filter >>> article back in 1958. But it seems he did. >>> >>> Regards, Joerg >>> >>> http://www.analogconsultants.com >> >> >> >> Hell, man, if I had been on the ball, I could have published in 1958. >> That's when my oldest was born. >> >> Jerry > > > And you had time left over for writing papers?
No. I was in college, trying to learn about continuous convolution from Misha Schwarts, first edition. When I invented the discrete version for myself as a learning tool, it came clear. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������
Bob Cain wrote:

> > > Tim Wescott wrote: > >> And you had time left over for writing papers? > > > For you younger guys, _TAKE_ that time. That and patents with your name > on them are an investment in the future that you can't afford not to > make if you wish to remain technical all the way out. I think quite a > few of us have learned that the hard way. > >
I'm working on a book -- is that close enough? -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com

Tim Wescott wrote:
> Bob Cain wrote: > >> >> >> Tim Wescott wrote: >> >>> And you had time left over for writing papers? >> >> >> For you younger guys, _TAKE_ that time. That and patents with your >> name on them are an investment in the future that you can't afford not >> to make if you wish to remain technical all the way out. I think >> quite a few of us have learned that the hard way. >> >> > I'm working on a book -- is that close enough?
Very good idea. :-) What's the topic? Bob -- "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no simpler." A. Einstein
Bob Cain wrote:

> > > Tim Wescott wrote: > >> Bob Cain wrote: >> >>> >>> >>> Tim Wescott wrote: >>> >>>> And you had time left over for writing papers? >>> >>> >>> >>> For you younger guys, _TAKE_ that time. That and patents with your >>> name on them are an investment in the future that you can't afford >>> not to make if you wish to remain technical all the way out. I think >>> quite a few of us have learned that the hard way. >>> >>> >> I'm working on a book -- is that close enough? > > > Very good idea. :-) > > What's the topic? > > > Bob
The topic (and working title) is "Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems". It's for all those digital guys who are now writing embedded software for systems that have to implement closed-loop control. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com