Forums

frequency modulation

Started by Unknown April 25, 2006
What type of hardware is typically used for frequency modulation?

mike7411@gmail.com wrote:
> What type of hardware is typically used for frequency modulation?
Can you me more specific about the application? Commercial broadcast practice is very different from unlicensed baby monitors. Once, when I was stuck in the shack at W2HJ (never mind why) and the plate modulator was on the bench for rework, I tack soldered the edges of a tin can top and bottom to adjacent turns of the grid coil of the exciter and hollered my plea for help at the assembly. The vibration of the near plate phase modulated the RF (40 meters) enough for a good Samaritan to copy. Had I attached to the tuning coil, it would have made FM. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������
Jerry Avins wrote:
> mike7411@gmail.com wrote: > > What type of hardware is typically used for frequency modulation? > > Can you me more specific about the application? Commercial broadcast > practice is very different from unlicensed baby monitors. > > Once, when I was stuck in the shack at W2HJ (never mind why) and the > plate modulator was on the bench for rework, I tack soldered the edges > of a tin can top and bottom to adjacent turns of the grid coil of the > exciter and hollered my plea for help at the assembly. The vibration of > the near plate phase modulated the RF (40 meters) enough for a good > Samaritan to copy. Had I attached to the tuning coil, it would have made FM. > > Jerry > -- >
Sounds like a "Carl and Jerry " story.... OMG, you're not "THE Jerry" are you? Mark
Mark wrote:

   ...

> OMG, you're not "THE Jerry" are you?
I don't _think_ so. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������
Jerry Avins wrote:
> mike7411@gmail.com wrote: > > What type of hardware is typically used for frequency modulation? > > Can you me more specific about the application? Commercial broadcast > practice is very different from unlicensed baby monitors. > > Once, when I was stuck in the shack at W2HJ (never mind why) and the > plate modulator was on the bench for rework, I tack soldered the edges > of a tin can
^^^^^^^^ Was that a Jerry can? 8-) Leon
Jerry Avins wrote:
> Mark wrote: > > ... > > > OMG, you're not "THE Jerry" are you? > > I don't _think_ so. > > Jerry >
In case you have no idea of what I'm talking about see.... http://home.gwi.net/~jdebell/pe/cj/cnjindex.htm I think Feb 1960 is your story but unfortunatly it's not on-line... Mark
"Mark" <makolber@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:1146079490.704886.20240@j33g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> > Jerry Avins wrote: >> Mark wrote: >> >> ... >> >> > OMG, you're not "THE Jerry" are you? >> >> I don't _think_ so. >> >> Jerry >> > > In case you have no idea of what I'm talking about see.... > > http://home.gwi.net/~jdebell/pe/cj/cnjindex.htm > > I think Feb 1960 is your story but unfortunatly it's not on-line... > > Mark >
The Jerry in the story gives his name as "Jerry Bishop". Look at the article "A New Company is Launched" Maybe our Jerry is known by more than one name! Even if "our Jerry" is not the one in the stories. Our Jerry needs to write down his stories for future generations to enjoy. Clay
Leon wrote:
> Jerry Avins wrote: > >>mike7411@gmail.com wrote: >> >>>What type of hardware is typically used for frequency modulation? >> >>Can you me more specific about the application? Commercial broadcast >>practice is very different from unlicensed baby monitors. >> >>Once, when I was stuck in the shack at W2HJ (never mind why) and the >>plate modulator was on the bench for rework, I tack soldered the edges >>of a tin can > > ^^^^^^^^ > > Was that a Jerry can? 8-)
If anybody can, Jerry can! The name "Jerry can" is a G.I. tribute to German engineering. Our (and British) five-gallon metal containers for gasoline and other liquids were thin ternplate, the same stuff used for gallons of maple syrup or olive oil. They were hard to carry and easily punctured. Captured German cans were sought after early in the North African campaign. They were the model for improved cans that were soon supplied. Our redesigned cans after the German model were even better: the screw closure used the same threads and accepted the same fittings as standard 55-gallon drums, and they have three handles instead of one. The inner handle is centered for use by a single person, while the outer two make it easy for two people to carry a single can -- they're heavy when full -- and the three together create a level surface that makes the cans easy to stack one above the other. The screw cap can be removed with a stick (in a pinch, a bayonet) or hammer (or rock) blows, and covers a vent hole that is exposed when a flexible pour spout is used in its place. It's an example of great design, still in use after 60 years. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;