Forums

Which DSP for audio ?

Started by Sam B April 30, 2006
Hi all !

Thank you for reading my post.

I would like to do a custom DSP board for audio processing. I also would 
like to put the release under GPL license, so I'd like to find a DSP for 
which gcc has been ported.

I first wanted to use a SHARC 212xx ou 213xx, but g21 only supports 210xx.

Then I saw TI C6272, but it seems that the c6x-gcc has not been targeted 
for c67x.

Well, I could use now a Freescale DSP563xx or a ADI Blackfin, but those 
are fixed point, and I've read that 32bit floating point is better for 
audio.

What about the ARM9x6E or MIPS 24ke ? Well, those are just cores, and it 
seems to be very difficult to find some silicon implementations.... 
Which manufacturers do some ?

Thank you in advance for any help

Sam
in article 44552880$0$13572$5402220f@news.sunrise.ch, Sam B at
hotmail@totalsam.com wrote on 04/30/2006 17:14:

> Hi all ! > > Thank you for reading my post.
well, since no one else responds ....
> I would like to do a custom DSP board for audio processing. I also would > like to put the release under GPL license, so I'd like to find a DSP for > which gcc has been ported.
you'ld like to make and sell your own board??? and package it with some C compiler?
> > I first wanted to use a SHARC 212xx or 213xx, but g21 only supports 210xx.
i thought that SHArC opcodes were upward or backward compatible. does g21 create code that cannot run on a 212xx? i think Al Clark oughta chip in here. he might already have the custom wheel that you want to re-engineer. -- r b-j rbj@audioimagination.com "Imagination is more important than knowledge."
TI TMS320C6713 for a professional audio (need a floating point DSP for
this)

Forget about gcc and GPL.

Get one of those DSP starter kits with Code Composer Studio etc.

You might also want to get an audio daughter card for use with DSK.


Sam B wrote:
> Hi all ! > > Thank you for reading my post. > > I would like to do a custom DSP board for audio processing. I also would > like to put the release under GPL license, so I'd like to find a DSP for > which gcc has been ported. > > I first wanted to use a SHARC 212xx ou 213xx, but g21 only supports 210xx. > > Then I saw TI C6272, but it seems that the c6x-gcc has not been targeted > for c67x. > > Well, I could use now a Freescale DSP563xx or a ADI Blackfin, but those > are fixed point, and I've read that 32bit floating point is better for > audio. > > What about the ARM9x6E or MIPS 24ke ? Well, those are just cores, and it > seems to be very difficult to find some silicon implementations.... > Which manufacturers do some ? > > Thank you in advance for any help > > Sam
robert bristow-johnson <rbj@audioimagination.com> wrote in
news:C07C778E.14237%rbj@audioimagination.com: 

> in article 44552880$0$13572$5402220f@news.sunrise.ch, Sam B at > hotmail@totalsam.com wrote on 04/30/2006 17:14: > >> Hi all ! >> >> Thank you for reading my post. > > well, since no one else responds .... > >> I would like to do a custom DSP board for audio processing. I also >> would like to put the release under GPL license, so I'd like to find >> a DSP for which gcc has been ported. > > you'ld like to make and sell your own board??? and package it with > some C compiler? > >> >> I first wanted to use a SHARC 212xx or 213xx, but g21 only supports >> 210xx. > > i thought that SHArC opcodes were upward or backward compatible. does > g21 create code that cannot run on a 212xx? > > i think Al Clark oughta chip in here. he might already have the > custom wheel that you want to re-engineer. >
ADI used to have the reputation that their parts were great and their tools sucked. The tools they were referring to were the old 2102x stuff you mentioned. You can get a free Visual DSP KIT license that operates on either our boards or the ADI EZ-Kits. These products include a built in debugger (ICE). The KIT license is restricted after 90 days to 1/4 of the available memory for program size. It starts out as a full license. For many projects, this is not an issue. The SHARC is the most popular DSP family for high performance audio. This is absolutely clear by just walking around an AES Conference for a few minutes. For the last few years, TI has been promoting converters and opamps at this conference and Freescale has not even been in attendance. The newest SHARC, the ADSP-21369 is a great DSP for audio. It supports SDRAM, 8 high serial ports (SPORTs), SPI, I2C, UARTs, S/PDIF, ASRC etc. We expect that virtually every new board we release this year will use a ADSP-21369. -- Al Clark Danville Signal Processing, Inc. -------------------------------------------------------------------- Purveyors of Fine DSP Hardware and other Cool Stuff Available at http://www.danvillesignal.com
robert bristow-johnson wrote:

> in article 44552880$0$13572$5402220f@news.sunrise.ch, Sam B at > hotmail@totalsam.com wrote on 04/30/2006 17:14: > > > Hi all ! > > > > Thank you for reading my post. > > well, since no one else responds .... > > > I would like to do a custom DSP board for audio processing. I also would > > like to put the release under GPL license, so I'd like to find a DSP for > > which gcc has been ported. > > you'ld like to make and sell your own board??? and package it with some C > compiler?
Some people just can't get enough :-).
> > > > > I first wanted to use a SHARC 212xx or 213xx, but g21 only supports 210xx. > > i thought that SHArC opcodes were upward or backward compatible. does g21 > create code that cannot run on a 212xx?
g21k only supporst 21060, 21061and 21062. Not even 21065L is supported. It is not trivial, if possible at all, to coerce g21k to produce code for the not-supported processors (see http://groups.google.ch/group/comp.dsp/msg/512379a3347ba48f and Jim's follow-up for a short discussion). The problem is not code compatibility but linking and memory maps.
> > i think Al Clark oughta chip in here. he might already have the custom > wheel that you want to re-engineer.
Both Danville or Beastrider should provide interesting reads for the OP. Regards, Andor
Al Clark wrote:

> You can get a free Visual DSP KIT license that operates on either our > boards or the ADI EZ-Kits. These products include a built in debugger > (ICE). The KIT license is restricted after 90 days to 1/4 of the > available memory for program size. It starts out as a full license.
Does this mean that only 1/4 of the available program memory is usable with the remainder wasted or that only 1/4 of the attached memory is available for program with the rest available for data? I don't know the memory architecture of the family. Thanks, Bob -- "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no simpler." A. Einstein
Bob Cain <arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote in
news:qYWdnb_1Gt2tnsTZRVn-jQ@giganews.com: 

> Al Clark wrote: > >> You can get a free Visual DSP KIT license that operates on either our >> boards or the ADI EZ-Kits. These products include a built in debugger >> (ICE). The KIT license is restricted after 90 days to 1/4 of the >> available memory for program size. It starts out as a full license. > > Does this mean that only 1/4 of the available program memory is usable > with the remainder wasted or that only 1/4 of the attached memory is > available for program with the rest available for data? I don't know > the memory architecture of the family. > > > Thanks, > > Bob
You can use all the memory. The linker restricts the program code to 1/4 of the available memory. For example, a long delay line doesn't count. The other restriction is that you can't use either an external emulator (which you don't need) or the simulator (which you probably don't need either since you have a buit in debugger). You also must be connected to the debugger. We build all of our dspstak boards in two versions, a debugger version (for development) and a production version (no debugger, lower cost). This allows our customers to develop their products inexpensively with a debugger version and then move to production version later. -- Al Clark Danville Signal Processing, Inc. -------------------------------------------------------------------- Purveyors of Fine DSP Hardware and other Cool Stuff Available at http://www.danvillesignal.com