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sound isolation

Started by jrsmith5601 January 17, 2008
"Rune Allnor" schrieb
> > > But then, recognizing is different from and IMHO > > much easier than separating. > > By means of DSP? What's the difference? How can you > recognize something if you can't separate it from > its surroundings? >
Sorry, I wasn't clear about the wording. Recognizing, as used in my post, is being able to tell if a given component (*) is present in the recording. Separating, then, is extracting this complete component (and hopefully all the component and only the component) from this recording. Ok, extracting might be a better word. Sorry. As an example, it is easier to tell that a piano is present in a classical recording, but extracting (separating) the piano part is much more difficult. Hope this clears up the misunderstanding. My fault. Martin (*) component from the OP's post: "Im trying to find software that allows me to import a song from a band and have that sound broken down into all its different components (like in CSI [...]"
On 18 Jan, 17:10, "Martin Blume" <mbl...@socha.net> wrote:
> "Rune Allnor" schrieb > > > > But then, recognizing is different from and IMHO > > > much easier than separating. > > > By means of DSP? What's the difference? How can you > > recognize something if you can't separate it from > > its surroundings?
...
> As an example, it is easier to tell that a piano is present > in a classical recording, but extracting (separating) the > piano part is much more difficult.
By means of DSP or by listening? Rune
Rune Allnor wrote:
> On 18 Jan, 17:10, "Martin Blume" <mbl...@socha.net> wrote: >> "Rune Allnor" schrieb >> >>>> But then, recognizing is different from and IMHO >>>> much easier than separating. >>> By means of DSP? What's the difference? How can you >>> recognize something if you can't separate it from >>> its surroundings? > ... >> As an example, it is easier to tell that a piano is present >> in a classical recording, but extracting (separating) the >> piano part is much more difficult. > > By means of DSP or by listening?
DSP as currently practiced, or as it might develop in another 50 years? Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
"Rune Allnor" schrieb
> > > > > > But then, recognizing is different from and IMHO > > > > much easier than separating. > > > > > By means of DSP? What's the difference? How can you > > > recognize something if you can't separate it from > > > its surroundings? > ... > > As an example, it is easier to tell that a piano is > > present in a classical recording, but extracting > > (separating) the piano part is much more difficult. > > By means of DSP or by listening? >
Both. Note that I didn't say anthing about the absolute level of difficulty of doing it, I just said that it would be easier to do recognition than extraction. IIRC, I read / heard somewhere that (very) good musician can write down the notes of a particular part (*) of a piece of music. A parametric extraction might (or might not) work like this: Assume that we know what instruments are played in the piece and "what they sound like" (**). So we could try to fit sum_over_instruments_i(notes(i)*"what they sound like"(notes(i)))(dT) to record(dT). Another way would be to record it with n microphones and locating the individual instruments. Although I have outlined two possible approaches, I am not confident that these could be made to work. But perhaps the OP can try it out :-) Regards Martin (*) I am not very musical and not fluid with musical language. Here, I mean the part that a certain single music instrument is playing. Heck, I sound like a lawyer :-( (**) the timbre, or to quote http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timbre: " ... For example, timbre is what, with a little practice, people use to distinguish the saxophone from the trumpet in a jazz group, even if both instruments are playing notes at the same pitch and amplitude. ..."
On 18 Jan., 17:38, Jerry Avins <j...@ieee.org> wrote:
> Rune Allnor wrote: > > On 18 Jan, 17:10, "Martin Blume" <mbl...@socha.net> wrote: > >> "Rune Allnor" schrieb > > >>>> But then, recognizing is different from and IMHO > >>>> much easier than separating. > >>> By means of DSP? What's the difference? How can you > >>> recognize something if you can't separate it from > >>> its surroundings? > > ... > >> As an example, it is easier to tell that a piano is present > >> in a classical recording, but extracting (separating) the > >> piano part is much more difficult. > > > By means of DSP or by listening? > > DSP as currently practiced, or as it might develop in another 50 years?
African or European swallow, sorry, DSP? :-)