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Good software list to enhance productivity of DSP designers.

Started by bharat pathak April 12, 2008
On Apr 12, 8:05&#2013266080;am, Randy Yates <ya...@ieee.org> wrote:
> John <sampson...@gmail.com> writes: > > On Apr 12, 6:12 am, "bharat pathak" <bha...@arithos.com> wrote: > >> Hello All, > > >> &#2013266080; So far we had discussions on listing good books on DSP > >> &#2013266080; and also some free books available online. > > >> &#2013266080; Let us start this discussion thread, on which free softwares > >> &#2013266080; DSP designers use to enhance their productivity? Like for > >> &#2013266080; example octave/scilab/rlab or others. > > >> &#2013266080; Please also mention that if the software runs only on windows > >> &#2013266080; /linux or both, and some useful features of the softwares. > > >> Regards > >> Bharat Pathak > > >> Arithos Designswww.Arithos.com > > >> DSP design consultancy and Training company. > > > I think you will find that the most productive engineers aren't pushed > > to use free tools by their management. > > You're correct - they run at full-speed voluntarily. > -- > % &#2013266080;Randy Yates &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080;% "My Shangri-la has gone away, fading like > %% Fuquay-Varina, NC &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080;% &#2013266080;the Beatles on 'Hey Jude'" > %%% 919-577-9882 &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080;% &#2013266080; > %%%% <ya...@ieee.org> &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; &#2013266080; % 'Shangri-La', *A New World Record*, ELOhttp://www.digitalsignallabs.com- Hide quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
Let me rephrase ... I think you will find that the most productive engineers are those that spend money on the right tools for the job. This applies to any size company. With that said, here are a few free tools that can improve productivity: - Linux - gcc - make - fftw - cvs - Eclipse I did not add Octave to the list. I think Matlab is worth the money for the plotting alone. John
>With that said, here are a few free tools that can improve >productivity:
>- Linux >- gcc >- make >- fftw >- cvs >- Eclipse
Eclipse is great for knocking up quick Java visualisation tools, it gives comprehensive help for class names and members. And using the free for personal use JIGLOO GUI editor you can create sliders and plotting panels very fast - also forces you to write the math code yourself instead using cheating with Matlab!
>I did not add Octave to the list. I think Matlab is worth the money >for the plotting alone.
>John
I prefer any simple screen-editor over eclips.

Give me joe.. That's enough. I prefer to write my code using the free 
microsoft visual studio express editions though.

I use gnuplot daily. Once a week for plotting but daily as calculator 
replacement.

And now for something strange: When it comes to serious math I prefer to 
use TI derive. It's cheap and aims for students/scholars but I get 99% 
of my math-problems solved with it. Also I can save my workspace files 
and give to to workmates. It takes 30 minutes for them to to get into 
the program and solve problems as well.

Matlab otoh is much more powerfull, but I never had the guts/time to 
learn it. Derive is so much easier.

   Nils
On Apr 12, 8:04 pm, Nils <n.pipenbri...@cubic.org> wrote:
> I prefer any simple screen-editor over eclips. > > Give me joe.. That's enough. I prefer to write my code using the free > microsoft visual studio express editions though. > > I use gnuplot daily. Once a week for plotting but daily as calculator > replacement. > > And now for something strange: When it comes to serious math I prefer to > use TI derive. It's cheap and aims for students/scholars but I get 99% > of my math-problems solved with it. Also I can save my workspace files > and give to to workmates. It takes 30 minutes for them to to get into > the program and solve problems as well. > > Matlab otoh is much more powerfull, but I never had the guts/time to > learn it. Derive is so much easier. > > Nils
On TI website it says Derive is no longer supported as of June 2007. It says the features will be incorporated into other tools. I assume those "other tools" won't be free. John
John schrieb:
> On TI website it says Derive is no longer supported as of June 2007. > It says the features will be incorporated into other tools. I assume > those "other tools" won't be free.
Derive was never free. You had to pay for it (not much though). It's sad news for me that they want to discontinue it. It was a great program. I started with version 1 (written in 1988) and I still have a copy of it running on my XT machine that I get out of the attic once a year for nostaliga reasons.
VelociChicken wrote:
>> All you need is a pensil, a shit of paper, a smart head and an assiduous >> ass. > > I guess the "shit of paper" is for use on the ass!? > > "Hey, what did the constipated mathematician do? - He worked it out with a > pencil!!!" *boom*boom* > > > Archimedes, Newton and Einstein perfectly dealt without any software. >> Why the fuck do you need anything more then they needed? > > They didn't have 15 billion calculations to do that morning?
Well, actually they did. They just threw up their hands and abandoned any hope of actually doing them, when they realised Microsoft had put back the delivery of the necessary tools yet again. :-) Steve
"Nils" <n.pipenbrinck@cubic.org> wrote in message 
news:66d2flF2jkda2U1@mid.uni-berlin.de...
> John schrieb: >> On TI website it says Derive is no longer supported as of June 2007. >> It says the features will be incorporated into other tools. I assume >> those "other tools" won't be free. > > Derive was never free. You had to pay for it (not much though). > > It's sad news for me that they want to discontinue it. It was a great > program. > > I started with version 1 (written in 1988) and I still have a copy of it > running on my XT machine that I get out of the attic once a year for > nostaliga reasons.
Derive and Matlab have some similarities, but Derive is primarily a symbolic math package. I use Derive also on occasion, primarily to avoid looking up trig and calculus relations in CRC and as an algebra checker. It was developed originally by Soft Warehouse in Honolulu from an earlier program named MuMath. I had a copy of MuMath for the TRS-80 back in the early 80's. After TI bought out Soft Warehouse they supported Derive and also used Derive as the basis for the TI-92 calculator. There are a number of free symbolic math packages, among them wxMaxima http://wxmaxima.sourceforge.netMaxima Best wishes, --Phil Martel
John wrote:
> Let me rephrase ... I think you will find that the most productive > engineers are those that spend money on the right tools for the job. > This applies to any size company. > > With that said, here are a few free tools that can improve > productivity: > > - Linux > - gcc > - make > - fftw > - cvs > - Eclipse > > I did not add Octave to the list. I think Matlab is worth the money > for the plotting alone.
Isn't it sad that they only maintain their value by plotting. :-) Steve
I think freebasic is great for prototyping.  So 80's but on a modern
fast computer, actually pretty fast (and you can do inline asm if
needed) , easy to do plots, openGL and to link in sound, image, and
video libraries using swag for freebasic.
http://www.freebasic.net/index.php/link
If you are caught using basic by you employer you'll be fired though.
I did tell you.