Forums

Slight dilemma

Started by shockdesignau July 22, 2004
Hi,

Just trying to write an assembler function for the DSP56858, based
on their example code on the SDK.

Now, the prototype for it is something like

long int myfunction(long int a, short int b, short int c) (all
signed)
and i was wondering with codewarrior, what registers does it
actually put those values passed in. Also need to know what register
it uses to pass data back out when I do the "rts".

I know with the short int's b & c, they get put into x0, y1, but not
sure with the long's..

If anyone knows, or can help me, can't seem to find anything in the
reference manuals, or in any information from codewarrior.

Cheers



CodeWarrior "Targeting 56800E" manul covers calling conventions.
This is what it says:

Calling Conventions and Stack Frames

Passing Values to Functions

The compiler uses registers A,B, R1, R2, R3, R4, Y0, and Y1 to pass
parameter
values to functions. Upon a function call, the compiler scans the
parameter list from
left to right, using registers for these values:
The first two 16-bit integer values Y0 and Y1.
The first two 32-bit integer or float values A and B.
The first four pointer parameter values R2, R3, R4, and R1 (in
that order).
The third and fourth 16-bit integer values A and B (provided
that the compiler
does not use these registers for 32-bit parameter values).
The third 16-bit integer value B (provided that the compiler
does not use this
register for a 32-bit parameter value).
The compiler passes the remaining parameter values on the stack. The
system
increments the stack by the total amount of space required for
memory parameters.
This incrementing must be an even number of words, as the stack
pointer (SP) must be
continuously long-aligned. The system moves parameter values to the
stack from left
to right, beginning with the stack location closest to the SP.
Because a long parameter
must begin at an even address, the compiler introduces one-word gaps
before long
parameter values, as appropriate.

Returning Values From Functions
The compiler returns function results in registers A, R0, R2, and Y0:
16-bit integer values Y0.
32-bit integer or float values A.
All pointer values R2.
Structure results R0 contains a pointer to a temporary space
allocated by the
caller. (The pointer is a hidden parameter value.)
Additionally, the compiler:
Reserves R5 for the stack frame pointer when a function makes a
dynamic
allocation. (This is the original stack pointer before allocations.)
Otherwise, the
compiler saves R5 across function calls.
Saves registers C10 and D10 across function calls.
Does not save registers C2 and D2 across function calls.
--- In , "shockdesignau"
<rajesh.singh@s...> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Just trying to write an assembler function for the DSP56858, based
> on their example code on the SDK.
>
> Now, the prototype for it is something like
>
> long int myfunction(long int a, short int b, short int c) (all
> signed)
> and i was wondering with codewarrior, what registers does it
> actually put those values passed in. Also need to know what
register
> it uses to pass data back out when I do the "rts".
>
> I know with the short int's b & c, they get put into x0, y1, but
not
> sure with the long's..
>
> If anyone knows, or can help me, can't seem to find anything in
the
> reference manuals, or in any information from codewarrior.
>
> Cheers





Thanks for that, still seem to be having a problem..

 

Ok.. in my header I have

 

extern long myfunc(long a, short b, short c);

 

then in my assembly file

 

SECTION rtlib

GLOBAL  Fmyfunc

 

            ORG P:

Fmyfunc:

            clr         A

            rts

 

            ENDSEC

            END

 

That should logically return a zero everytime, but instead I’m getting some random number which is the number 5198, since  a long is a 32bit number, so clearing A and returning it should be giving me back zero.

 

Is there something I’m missing?

 

Rajesh Singh

 

From: help56800 [mailto:h...@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, 22 July 2004 12:55 PM
To: m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

 

CodeWarrior "Targeting 56800E" manul covers calling conventions.
This is what it says:

Calling Conventions and Stack Frames

Passing Values to Functions

The compiler uses registers A,B, R1, R2, R3, R4, Y0, and Y1 to pass
parameter
values to functions. Upon a function call, the compiler scans the
parameter list from
left to right, using registers for these values:
• The first two 16-bit integer values — Y0 and Y1.
• The first two 32-bit integer or float values — A and B.
• The first four pointer parameter values — R2, R3, R4, and R1 (in
that order).
• The third and fourth 16-bit integer values — A and B (provided
that the compiler
does not use these registers for 32-bit parameter values).
• The third 16-bit integer value — B (provided that the compiler
does not use this
register for a 32-bit parameter value).
The compiler passes the remaining parameter values on the stack. The
system
increments the stack by the total amount of space required for
memory parameters.
This incrementing must be an even number of words, as the stack
pointer (SP) must be
continuously long-aligned. The system moves parameter values to the
stack from left
to right, beginning with the stack location closest to the SP.
Because a long parameter
must begin at an even address, the compiler introduces one-word gaps
before long
parameter values, as appropriate.

Returning Values From Functions
The compiler returns function results in registers A, R0, R2, and Y0:
• 16-bit integer values — Y0.
• 32-bit integer or float values — A.
• All pointer values — R2.
• Structure results — R0 contains a pointer to a temporary space
allocated by the
caller. (The pointer is a hidden parameter value.)
Additionally, the compiler:
• Reserves R5 for the stack frame pointer when a function makes a
dynamic
allocation. (This is the original stack pointer before allocations.)
Otherwise, the
compiler saves R5 across function calls.
• Saves registers C10 and D10 across function calls.
• Does not save registers C2 and D2 across function calls.

_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3



The answer will most likely be very obvious when looking at the actual generated assember code. I'd rely on the real thing over the "rules from the manual" any day of the week. That is not to say that those rules are not followed or are inaccurate.
 
Howard
-----Original Message-----
From: Rajesh Singh [mailto:r...@shockdesign.com.au]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2004 12:34 AM
To: 'help56800'; m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

Thanks for that, still seem to be having a problem..

 

Ok.. in my header I have

 

extern long myfunc(long a, short b, short c);

 

then in my assembly file

 

SECTION rtlib

GLOBAL  Fmyfunc

 

            ORG P:

Fmyfunc:

            clr         A

            rts

 

            ENDSEC

            END

 

That should logically return a zero everytime, but instead I'm getting some random number which is the number 5198, since  a long is a 32bit number, so clearing A and returning it should be giving me back zero.

 

Is there something I'm missing?

 

Rajesh Singh

 

From: help56800 [mailto:h...@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, 22 July 2004 12:55 PM
To: m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

 

CodeWarrior "Targeting 56800E" manul covers calling conventions.
This is what it says:

Calling Conventions and Stack Frames

Passing Values to Functions

The compiler uses registers A,B, R1, R2, R3, R4, Y0, and Y1 to pass
parameter
values to functions. Upon a function call, the compiler scans the
parameter list from
left to right, using registers for these values:
* The first two 16-bit integer values - Y0 and Y1.
* The first two 32-bit integer or float values - A and B.
* The first four pointer parameter values - R2, R3, R4, and R1 (in
that order).
* The third and fourth 16-bit integer values - A and B (provided
that the compiler
does not use these registers for 32-bit parameter values).
* The third 16-bit integer value - B (provided that the compiler
does not use this
register for a 32-bit parameter value).
The compiler passes the remaining parameter values on the stack. The
system
increments the stack by the total amount of space required for
memory parameters.
This incrementing must be an even number of words, as the stack
pointer (SP) must be
continuously long-aligned. The system moves parameter values to the
stack from left
to right, beginning with the stack location closest to the SP.
Because a long parameter
must begin at an even address, the compiler introduces one-word gaps
before long
parameter values, as appropriate.

Returning Values From Functions
The compiler returns function results in registers A, R0, R2, and Y0:
* 16-bit integer values - Y0.
* 32-bit integer or float values - A.
* All pointer values - R2.
* Structure results - R0 contains a pointer to a temporary space
allocated by the
caller. (The pointer is a hidden parameter value.)
Additionally, the compiler:
* Reserves R5 for the stack frame pointer when a function makes a
dynamic
allocation. (This is the original stack pointer before allocations.)
Otherwise, the
compiler saves R5 across function calls.
* Saves registers C10 and D10 across function calls.
* Does not save registers C2 and D2 across function calls.

_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3



_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3


Message
Yeah I actually looked at the generated asm code from a C version of the function i'm writing, somehow they passed it back to C (as in the register), which didnt work when I tried it in pure assembler.
 
So not sure whats going on, i tried every register to pass something back, and no avail. Will keep trying anything else I can think of...
 
If anyone else has any other ideas? :)
 

Rajesh Singh
r...@shockdesign.com.au
http://www.shockdesign.com.au
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ebersman, Howard [mailto:H...@microwavedata.com]
Sent: Thursday, 22 July 2004 11:29 PM
To: 'Rajesh Singh'; 'help56800'; m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

The answer will most likely be very obvious when looking at the actual generated assember code. I'd rely on the real thing over the "rules from the manual" any day of the week. That is not to say that those rules are not followed or are inaccurate.
 
Howard
-----Original Message-----
From: Rajesh Singh [mailto:r...@shockdesign.com.au]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2004 12:34 AM
To: 'help56800'; m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

Thanks for that, still seem to be having a problem..

 

Ok.. in my header I have

 

extern long myfunc(long a, short b, short c);

 

then in my assembly file

 

SECTION rtlib

GLOBAL  Fmyfunc

 

            ORG P:

Fmyfunc:

            clr         A

            rts

 

            ENDSEC

            END

 

That should logically return a zero everytime, but instead I'm getting some random number which is the number 5198, since  a long is a 32bit number, so clearing A and returning it should be giving me back zero.

 

Is there something I'm missing?

 

Rajesh Singh

 

From: help56800 [mailto:h...@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, 22 July 2004 12:55 PM
To: m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

 

CodeWarrior "Targeting 56800E" manul covers calling conventions.
This is what it says:

Calling Conventions and Stack Frames

Passing Values to Functions

The compiler uses registers A,B, R1, R2, R3, R4, Y0, and Y1 to pass
parameter
values to functions. Upon a function call, the compiler scans the
parameter list from
left to right, using registers for these values:
* The first two 16-bit integer values - Y0 and Y1.
* The first two 32-bit integer or float values - A and B.
* The first four pointer parameter values - R2, R3, R4, and R1 (in
that order).
* The third and fourth 16-bit integer values - A and B (provided
that the compiler
does not use these registers for 32-bit parameter values).
* The third 16-bit integer value - B (provided that the compiler
does not use this
register for a 32-bit parameter value).
The compiler passes the remaining parameter values on the stack. The
system
increments the stack by the total amount of space required for
memory parameters.
This incrementing must be an even number of words, as the stack
pointer (SP) must be
continuously long-aligned. The system moves parameter values to the
stack from left
to right, beginning with the stack location closest to the SP.
Because a long parameter
must begin at an even address, the compiler introduces one-word gaps
before long
parameter values, as appropriate.

Returning Values From Functions
The compiler returns function results in registers A, R0, R2, and Y0:
* 16-bit integer values - Y0.
* 32-bit integer or float values - A.
* All pointer values - R2.
* Structure results - R0 contains a pointer to a temporary space
allocated by the
caller. (The pointer is a hidden parameter value.)
Additionally, the compiler:
* Reserves R5 for the stack frame pointer when a function makes a
dynamic
allocation. (This is the original stack pointer before allocations.)
Otherwise, the
compiler saves R5 across function calls.
* Saves registers C10 and D10 across function calls.
* Does not save registers C2 and D2 across function calls.

_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3



_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3


FYI:
when using Codewarrior 6.1 and a target cpu of 568357, the "rules from the manual" work as advertised.
 
in a "C" file I put the following code:
 
    extern long myFunc(long a, int b, int c);
...
    long temp32;
...
 
    temp32 = myFunc(1000,10,20);
 
In another "C" file I put the following:
 
asm long myFunc(long a, int b, int c) {
 
//return (a + (L_mult(b,c));
 mpy y1,y0,b
 ADD b,a
 rts
After execution the value of 1400 was in the temp32 variable.
 
Dissassembly of the call yielded:
 
   *** EXECUTABLE CODE (.text) ***
 
Address     ObjectCode  Label      Opcode      Operands                    Comment
 
0x00000000              Fmain:
0x00000000  0xE40003E8             move.l      #1000,A
0x00000002  0xE58A                 move.w      #10,Y0
0x00000003  0xE794                 move.w      #20,Y1
0x00000004  0xE2540000             jsr         0x000000                    ; FmyFunc
0x00000006  0xD07D0000             move.l      A10,X:0x000000              ; Ftemp32
...
...

   *** RELOCATIONS (.rela.text) ***
 
no     type                  offset      addend      symbol
 
1      R_56800E_CODE19       0x00000008  0x00000000  FmyFunc
2      R_56800E_LONG16       0x0000000B  0x00000000  Ftemp32
...
 
hope this helps!!!
 
Jerry.
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ebersman, Howard [mailto:H...@microwavedata.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2004 8:29 AM
To: 'Rajesh Singh'; 'help56800'; m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

The answer will most likely be very obvious when looking at the actual generated assember code. I'd rely on the real thing over the "rules from the manual" any day of the week. That is not to say that those rules are not followed or are inaccurate.
 
Howard
-----Original Message-----
From: Rajesh Singh [mailto:r...@shockdesign.com.au]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2004 12:34 AM
To: 'help56800'; m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

Thanks for that, still seem to be having a problem..

 

Ok.. in my header I have

 

extern long myfunc(long a, short b, short c);

 

then in my assembly file

 

SECTION rtlib

GLOBAL  Fmyfunc

 

            ORG P:

Fmyfunc:

            clr         A

            rts

 

            ENDSEC

            END

 

That should logically return a zero everytime, but instead I'm getting some random number which is the number 5198, since  a long is a 32bit number, so clearing A and returning it should be giving me back zero.

 

Is there something I'm missing?

 

Rajesh Singh

 

From: help56800 [mailto:h...@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, 22 July 2004 12:55 PM
To: m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

 

CodeWarrior "Targeting 56800E" manul covers calling conventions.
This is what it says:

Calling Conventions and Stack Frames

Passing Values to Functions

The compiler uses registers A,B, R1, R2, R3, R4, Y0, and Y1 to pass
parameter
values to functions. Upon a function call, the compiler scans the
parameter list from
left to right, using registers for these values:
* The first two 16-bit integer values - Y0 and Y1.
* The first two 32-bit integer or float values - A and B.
* The first four pointer parameter values - R2, R3, R4, and R1 (in
that order).
* The third and fourth 16-bit integer values - A and B (provided
that the compiler
does not use these registers for 32-bit parameter values).
* The third 16-bit integer value - B (provided that the compiler
does not use this
register for a 32-bit parameter value).
The compiler passes the remaining parameter values on the stack. The
system
increments the stack by the total amount of space required for
memory parameters.
This incrementing must be an even number of words, as the stack
pointer (SP) must be
continuously long-aligned. The system moves parameter values to the
stack from left
to right, beginning with the stack location closest to the SP.
Because a long parameter
must begin at an even address, the compiler introduces one-word gaps
before long
parameter values, as appropriate.

Returning Values From Functions
The compiler returns function results in registers A, R0, R2, and Y0:
* 16-bit integer values - Y0.
* 32-bit integer or float values - A.
* All pointer values - R2.
* Structure results - R0 contains a pointer to a temporary space
allocated by the
caller. (The pointer is a hidden parameter value.)
Additionally, the compiler:
* Reserves R5 for the stack frame pointer when a function makes a
dynamic
allocation. (This is the original stack pointer before allocations.)
Otherwise, the
compiler saves R5 across function calls.
* Saves registers C10 and D10 across function calls.
* Does not save registers C2 and D2 across function calls.

_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3



_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3


_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3

________________________________________________________________________
This email has been scanned for all viruses by the MessageLabs SkyScan
service. For more information visit http://www.messagelabs.com
________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________
This email has been scanned for all viruses by the MessageLabs SkyScan
service. For more information visit http://www.messagelabs.com
________________________________________________________________________

Jerry,

 

Thanks for that, seems to work a lot better as inline assembly in a “C” file, then when I was doing it as an external assembly file, with a “C” defined header. Actually compiles and runs now.

 

 

Rajesh Singh

From: Johnson, Jerry [mailto:j...@giddings.com]
Sent: Friday, 23 July 2004 1:50 AM
To: 'Ebersman, Howard'; 'Rajesh Singh'; 'help56800'; m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

 

FYI:

when using Codewarrior 6.1 and a target cpu of 568357, the "rules from the manual" work as advertised.

 

in a "C" file I put the following code:

 

    extern long myFunc(long a, int b, int c);
...

    long temp32;
...

 

    temp32 myFunc(1000,10,20);

 

In another "C" file I put the following:

 

asm long myFunc(long a, int b, int c) {

 

//return (a + (L_mult(b,c));
 mpy y1,y0,b
 ADD b,a
 rts

After execution the value of 1400 was in the temp32 variable.

 

Dissassembly of the call yielded:

 

   *** EXECUTABLE CODE (.text) ***

 

Address     ObjectCode  Label      Opcode      Operands                    Comment

 

0x00000000              Fmain:
0x00000000  0xE40003E8             move.l      #1000,A
0x00000002  0xE58A                 move.w      #10,Y0
0x00000003  0xE794                 move.w      #20,Y1
0x00000004  0xE2540000             jsr         0x000000                    ; FmyFunc
0x00000006  0xD07D0000             move.l      A10,X:0x000000              ; Ftemp32
...

...


   *** RELOCATIONS (.rela.text) ***

 

no     type                  offset      addend      symbol

 

1      R_56800E_CODE19       0x00000008  0x00000000  FmyFunc
2      R_56800E_LONG16       0x0000000B  0x00000000  Ftemp32
...

 

hope this helps!!!

 

Jerry.

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ebersman, Howard [mailto:H...@microwavedata.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2004 8:29 AM
To: 'Rajesh Singh'; 'help56800'; m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

The answer will most likely be very obvious when looking at the actual generated assember code. I'd rely on the real thing over the "rules from the manual" any day of the week. That is not to say that those rules are not followed or are inaccurate.

 

Howard

-----Original Message-----
From: Rajesh Singh [mailto:r...@shockdesign.com.au]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2004 12:34 AM
To: 'help56800'; m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

Thanks for that, still seem to be having a problem..

 

Ok.. in my header I have

 

extern long myfunc(long a, short b, short c);

 

then in my assembly file

 

SECTION rtlib

GLOBAL  Fmyfunc

 

            ORG P:

Fmyfunc:

            clr         A

            rts

 

            ENDSEC

            END

 

That should logically return a zero everytime, but instead I'm getting some random number which is the number 5198, since  a long is a 32bit number, so clearing A and returning it should be giving me back zero.

 

Is there something I'm missing?

 

Rajesh Singh

 

From: help56800 [mailto:h...@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, 22 July 2004 12:55 PM
To: m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [motoroladsp] Re: Slight dilemma

 

CodeWarrior "Targeting 56800E" manul covers calling conventions.
This is what it says:

Calling Conventions and Stack Frames

Passing Values to Functions

The compiler uses registers A,B, R1, R2, R3, R4, Y0, and Y1 to pass
parameter
values to functions. Upon a function call, the compiler scans the
parameter list from
left to right, using registers for these values:
* The first two 16-bit integer values - Y0 and Y1.
* The first two 32-bit integer or float values - A and B.
* The first four pointer parameter values - R2, R3, R4, and R1 (in
that order).
* The third and fourth 16-bit integer values - A and B (provided
that the compiler
does not use these registers for 32-bit parameter values).
* The third 16-bit integer value - B (provided that the compiler
does not use this
register for a 32-bit parameter value).
The compiler passes the remaining parameter values on the stack. The
system
increments the stack by the total amount of space required for
memory parameters.
This incrementing must be an even number of words, as the stack
pointer (SP) must be
continuously long-aligned. The system moves parameter values to the
stack from left
to right, beginning with the stack location closest to the SP.
Because a long parameter
must begin at an even address, the compiler introduces one-word gaps
before long
parameter values, as appropriate.

Returning Values From Functions
The compiler returns function results in registers A, R0, R2, and Y0:
* 16-bit integer values - Y0.
* 32-bit integer or float values - A.
* All pointer values - R2.
* Structure results - R0 contains a pointer to a temporary space
allocated by the
caller. (The pointer is a hidden parameter value.)
Additionally, the compiler:
* Reserves R5 for the stack frame pointer when a function makes a
dynamic
allocation. (This is the original stack pointer before allocations.)
Otherwise, the
compiler saves R5 across function calls.
* Saves registers C10 and D10 across function calls.
* Does not save registers C2 and D2 across function calls.

_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3



_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3




_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3

________________________________________________________________________
This email has been scanned for all viruses by the MessageLabs SkyScan
service. For more information visit http://www.messagelabs.com
________________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________________
This email has been scanned for all viruses by the MessageLabs SkyScan
service. For more information visit http://www.messagelabs.com
________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________
Note: If you do a simple "reply" with your email client, only the author of this message will receive your answer.  You need to do a "reply all" if you want your answer to be distributed to the entire group.

_____________________________________
About this discussion group:

To Join:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Post:  m...@yahoogroups.com

To Leave: m...@yahoogroups.com

Archives: http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/motoroladsp

More Groups: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups.php3