sound risks?

Started by It's me August 9, 2003
Good day to everybody!

I've recently begun a research about computer generated sound and 
I still want to continue with that work for some months.

I'm creating different sounds using compositions of sinusoidal waves
of different frequencies. I listen to the sound I create using the 
typical hi-fi equiment with tape decks, cd reader, radio and so on
and an AUX input that I attach to the SPK output of my sound card
and a pair of baffles, or I use a pair of little amplified speakers on
my table.

I've found here and there some informations regarding the health risk
of sounds, particularly infrasounds. Some of them say even a little
powered infrasound can be a serious risk for your health, including
internal organs and neurological damage.

I'd like to know if I could be in any risk creating computer generated
sounds that could, accidentally or not, include some low frequency
components ( or even the risks I should condider and avoid with
this generated sounds, in general ).

Thank you very much in advance,

                                                        Alvaro Barrero
 
It's me wrote:
> > Good day to everybody! > > I've recently begun a research about computer generated sound and > I still want to continue with that work for some months. > > I'm creating different sounds using compositions of sinusoidal waves > of different frequencies. I listen to the sound I create using the > typical hi-fi equiment with tape decks, cd reader, radio and so on > and an AUX input that I attach to the SPK output of my sound card > and a pair of baffles, or I use a pair of little amplified speakers on > my table. > > I've found here and there some informations regarding the health risk > of sounds, particularly infrasounds. Some of them say even a little > powered infrasound can be a serious risk for your health, including > internal organs and neurological damage. > > I'd like to know if I could be in any risk creating computer generated > sounds that could, accidentally or not, include some low frequency > components ( or even the risks I should condider and avoid with > this generated sounds, in general ). > > Thank you very much in advance, > > Alvaro Barrero >
Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor. I don't know the current state of research in this field. According to what I believe I know: You needn't worry about any infrasonic problems emanating from your speakers. Ut's a rare speaker that puts out significant energy below 30 Hz, and your for little table speakers to go below 120 Hz would be astonishing. You will certainly hear something if you feed them with, say, 40 Hz, but that will be distortion products spaced 40 Hz apart. Your ear will interpret that as a 40-Hz note. (See "synthetic bass.) Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. �����������������������������������������������������������������������
It's me wrote:

> I'd like to know if I could be in any risk creating computer generated > sounds that could, accidentally or not, include some low frequency > components ( or even the risks I should condider and avoid with > this generated sounds, in general ).
First of all, google helps a lot and this is not really a NG for this kind of biological questions. Nevertheless, this is what I found: http://www.markpurdey.com/science_the_origins_of_bse_7.htm http://www.paraarchives.com/wots/1999/1999-12-20-02a.htm It seems the first is more serious than the second, up to you to judge. bye, -- Piergiorgio Sartor
If you have very efficient tweeters on your system, eg. piezoelectric
horns, then you need to be worried about hearing damage due to high
frequency sounds.

With low frequency, you need enormous amounts of power to do any
damage, so unless you have a very high power stage bass amplifier
rated a several hundred Watt hooked up, you need not worry about that.

Cheers,

Herman
http://www.AerospaceSoftware.com


Piergiorgio Sartor <piergiorgio.sartor@nexgo.REMOVE.THIS.de> wrote in message
news:<3f375207$0$245$4d4ebb8e@read.news.de.uu.net>...
> It's me wrote: > > > I'd like to know if I could be in any risk creating computer generated > > sounds that could, accidentally or not, include some low frequency > > components ( or even the risks I should condider and avoid with > > this generated sounds, in general ). > > First of all, google helps a lot and this is not > really a NG for this kind of biological questions. > > Nevertheless, this is what I found: > > http://www.markpurdey.com/science_the_origins_of_bse_7.htm > > http://www.paraarchives.com/wots/1999/1999-12-20-02a.htm > > It seems the first is more serious than the second, > up to you to judge. > > bye,
Herman Oosthuysen <HermanZA8@netscape.net> wrote:
>Piergiorgio Sartor <piergiorgio.sartor@nexgo.REMOVE.THIS.de> wrote: >> It's me wrote: >> >> > I'd like to know if I could be in any risk creating computer generated >> > sounds that could, accidentally or not, include some low frequency >> > components ( or even the risks I should condider and avoid with >> > this generated sounds, in general ). >> >If you have very efficient tweeters on your system, eg. piezoelectric >horns, then you need to be worried about hearing damage due to high >frequency sounds. > >With low frequency, you need enormous amounts of power to do any >damage, so unless you have a very high power stage bass amplifier >rated a several hundred Watt hooked up, you need not worry about that.
Also avoid the temptation to audition new algorithms over headphones: a fellow did that at another company, but a filter went unstable - the other engineers could hear the oscillation across the room - and he was months recovering his hearing. Francois.