Forums

Behind-the-scenes software equalizer

Started by Unknown June 27, 2005
Hello,

I recently pulled a pair of old stereo speakers out of my basement to
use with my PC.  The only markings that might identify them I can find
on them are "MLI 691H Hi-Fi Sound Monitor"

Anyways, they don't really have that great of a sound quality, and I
was wondering if there are any software equalizers out there that would
allow me to tweak various frequencies.  I was hoping this equalizer
could run in the background on WindowsXP, like in the SysTray or
something, so that the adjustments effect every program (i.e, not just
a given media player or something; I know iTunes and WMP have built in
equalizers).

Could someone reply and let me know if such a program exists, if it's
free or not, where to get it, etc?  Thanks a lot.

Hi!

     Don't know if this gets you what you want, but it's free... used it 
several years ago, and it was pretty good then ...

http://www.goldwave.com/features.php
http://www.goldwave.com/release.php

Kind regards,

dj

presentt@verizon.net wrote:
> Hello, > > I recently pulled a pair of old stereo speakers out of my basement to > use with my PC. The only markings that might identify them I can find > on them are "MLI 691H Hi-Fi Sound Monitor" > > Anyways, they don't really have that great of a sound quality, and I > was wondering if there are any software equalizers out there that would > allow me to tweak various frequencies. I was hoping this equalizer > could run in the background on WindowsXP, like in the SysTray or > something, so that the adjustments effect every program (i.e, not just > a given media player or something; I know iTunes and WMP have built in > equalizers). > > Could someone reply and let me know if such a program exists, if it's > free or not, where to get it, etc? Thanks a lot. >
Thanks, but actually I've already got Goldwave.  I'm looking for
something that will alter the frequency levels at any time, even when I
don't have a specific source file.  E.g, I want the levels to be
changed for the sound effect of firing my gun in SOF2, *and* when I use
the line-in on my PC to play an old cassette, etc.

I don't even know if something like this exists, but if someone can
figure out what I mean (haha....) and knows a solution, please let me
know.

Thanks.

I know the drivers for some sound cards (or similarly, built-in sound hardware)
include an adjustable graphic equalizer on the outputs (as well as reverb,
etc.), but I don't know of any stand-alone programs.  You might be better off
just buying some cheap but slightly better quality speakers.  There are some
inexpensive decent-quality versions out there.

<presentt@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:1119901644.688517.136920@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hello, > > I recently pulled a pair of old stereo speakers out of my basement to > use with my PC. The only markings that might identify them I can find > on them are "MLI 691H Hi-Fi Sound Monitor" > > Anyways, they don't really have that great of a sound quality, and I > was wondering if there are any software equalizers out there that would > allow me to tweak various frequencies. I was hoping this equalizer > could run in the background on WindowsXP, like in the SysTray or > something, so that the adjustments effect every program (i.e, not just > a given media player or something; I know iTunes and WMP have built in > equalizers). > > Could someone reply and let me know if such a program exists, if it's > free or not, where to get it, etc? Thanks a lot.

presentt@verizon.net wrote:
> Thanks, but actually I've already got Goldwave. I'm looking for > something that will alter the frequency levels at any time, even when I > don't have a specific source file. E.g, I want the levels to be > changed for the sound effect of firing my gun in SOF2, *and* when I use > the line-in on my PC to play an old cassette, etc. > > I don't even know if something like this exists, but if someone can > figure out what I mean (haha....) and knows a solution, please let me > know.
When I wish a source independant process to be performed on audio data destined for my soundcard I use a combination of AudioMulch (free) and Virtual Audio Cable (not free but not much.) You can configure any/all applications including Win Multimedia to go to a Virtual Audio Cable input which is paired with an output that can be selected as input by AudioMulch. With an AudioMulch "patch" (document) file you can connect any kind of VST plugin betweeb its input(s) and its output(s) such as a VST equalizer or convolver (very good ones available from Voxengo.) Mulch's input will be from Virtual Audio Cable and its output will be your sound card. If you include a link to the Mulch patch file containing your process and its input/output configuration in your StartUp folder Mulch can come up at boot time and you never have to think about it unless you want to tweak the equalizer. After installation, Virtual Audio Cable is available at the driver level from then on and nothing special need be done at boot time. This is all much simpler in practice than it sounds. The apps are quite intuitive if you've worked with PC audio much at all. The patch can contain other Mulch intrinsic widgets which allow more complex configurations such as creation of a "bypass" function that is easily selected (if the plugin doesn't have it as a control.) Mulch, while created to be a flexible synth maker, is also very adept at arbitrary audio stream processing when used with VST plugins. You will get latency with such setups though which can be annoying from a DAW application. If you're on a Mac, I dunno. :-) Bob -- "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no simpler." A. Einstein
"Bob Cain" <arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote in message
news:d9pp6h01q5@enews1.newsguy.com...
> > > presentt@verizon.net wrote: > > Thanks, but actually I've already got Goldwave. I'm looking for > > something that will alter the frequency levels at any time, even when I > > don't have a specific source file. E.g, I want the levels to be > > changed for the sound effect of firing my gun in SOF2, *and* when I use > > the line-in on my PC to play an old cassette, etc. > > > > I don't even know if something like this exists, but if someone can > > figure out what I mean (haha....) and knows a solution, please let me > > know.
This might work: http://www.highcriteria.com/AddOnEQ.htm
presentt@verizon.net wrote:
> Hello, > > I recently pulled a pair of old stereo speakers out of my basement to > use with my PC. The only markings that might identify them I can find > on them are "MLI 691H Hi-Fi Sound Monitor" > > Anyways, they don't really have that great of a sound quality, and I > was wondering if there are any software equalizers out there that would > allow me to tweak various frequencies. I was hoping this equalizer > could run in the background on WindowsXP, like in the SysTray or > something, so that the adjustments effect every program (i.e, not just > a given media player or something; I know iTunes and WMP have built in > equalizers).
Instead of getting a program to work in systray, it probably would be much simpler, sound better, be more reliable, easier to install, operating system and computer hardware independent, extremely portable, upgrade/virus resistant and only marginally more expensive if you went to your local flee market (or e-bay) and got yourself a stereo graphic equalizer. Regards, Andor
Andor wrote:
> presentt@verizon.net wrote: > >>Hello, >> >>I recently pulled a pair of old stereo speakers out of my basement to >>use with my PC. The only markings that might identify them I can find >>on them are "MLI 691H Hi-Fi Sound Monitor" >> >>Anyways, they don't really have that great of a sound quality, and I >>was wondering if there are any software equalizers out there that would >>allow me to tweak various frequencies. I was hoping this equalizer >>could run in the background on WindowsXP, like in the SysTray or >>something, so that the adjustments effect every program (i.e, not just >>a given media player or something; I know iTunes and WMP have built in >>equalizers). > > > Instead of getting a program to work in systray, it probably would be > much simpler, sound better, be more reliable, easier to install, > operating system and computer hardware independent, extremely portable, > upgrade/virus resistant and only marginally more expensive if you went > to your local flee market (or e-bay) and got yourself a stereo graphic > equalizer.
Or decent speakers. You can sometimes simulate a silk purse using a sow's ear, but the weave is never quite right. Translating, while you can equalize the frequency response of a peaky/dippy speaker -- you can make it dead flat with enough care -- it usually makes the phase response so bad that you'll wish you hadn't. I haven't investigated what one can do with a single FIR that covers the whole range. Since I don't know it won't work, that would be one of the first ways I'd try. In any case, there's no need for variability. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;
Jerry Avins wrote:
> Andor wrote: > > presentt@verizon.net wrote: > > > >>Hello, > >> > >>I recently pulled a pair of old stereo speakers out of my basement to > >>use with my PC. The only markings that might identify them I can find > >>on them are "MLI 691H Hi-Fi Sound Monitor" > >> > >>Anyways, they don't really have that great of a sound quality, and I > >>was wondering if there are any software equalizers out there that would > >>allow me to tweak various frequencies. I was hoping this equalizer > >>could run in the background on WindowsXP, like in the SysTray or > >>something, so that the adjustments effect every program (i.e, not just > >>a given media player or something; I know iTunes and WMP have built in > >>equalizers). > > > > > > Instead of getting a program to work in systray, it probably would be > > much simpler, sound better, be more reliable, easier to install, > > operating system and computer hardware independent, extremely portable, > > upgrade/virus resistant and only marginally more expensive if you went > > to your local flee market (or e-bay) and got yourself a stereo graphic > > equalizer. > > Or decent speakers. You can sometimes simulate a silk purse using a > sow's ear, but the weave is never quite right. > > Translating, while you can equalize the frequency response of a > peaky/dippy speaker -- you can make it dead flat with enough care -- it > usually makes the phase response so bad that you'll wish you hadn't.
Agreed - and we haven't even discussed the problem that the "frequency response" from the speakers to the ear is not well defined (it changes chaotically as one moves around or changes the position or aim of the speakers). Similarly, many dips and non-linearities in of the frequency response of a speaker are non-equalizable (usually due to reflections within the speaker cabinet). But for subjective frequency response adjustment (boosting the highs and lows is a favourite), a graphic equalizer will do the job (a parametric would do it in a simpler manner, but they require more know-how to setup and usually are more expensive).
> I haven't investigated what one can do with a single FIR that covers the > whole range. Since I don't know it won't work, that would be one of the > first ways I'd try. In any case, there's no need for variability.
Getting a good speaker would be the proper solution, as Jon already mentioned. However, I doubt one can get a good pair of speakers for $20 (which seems to be about the price of a graphic stereo equalizer on ebay). Regards, Andor
Andor wrote:
   ...

> Getting a good speaker would be the proper solution, as Jon already > mentioned. However, I doubt one can get a good pair of speakers for $20 > (which seems to be about the price of a graphic stereo equalizer on > ebay).
I believe that the best speakers on can buy for $20 a pair will sound better than ones with light magnets, thin cones, and the best of equalizers. A quick look around the web tells me I'm behind the times on price. Radio Shack no longer lists the replacement speakers I had in mind. I need to double my price estimate. I wonder what my pair of 15" Tannoys is worth! Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. &#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;&#2013266095;