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Imaginary values non-null in FFTW Java wrapper real transform

Started by SeanOg May 16, 2006
Hi all,

I was hoping someone could shed some light on this problem Im having. Ill
be as clear as possible.

Im using the Java JNI wrapper for FFTW. The problem I am having is
regarding the imaginary components being returned from a real to complex
tranform.

As I understand it, the format of the array returned by the FFTW real to
complex transform is (for an even N length signal);

[dc][r1][r2][r3][r4][ny][i4][i3][i2][i1]

where 
dc = direct component
ny = nyquist
and
(rx, ix) are the various imaginary numbers

If I input a pure cosine wave of fHz, I would assume that all the [ix]
elements of the array would be zero or close enough. However I'm getting
some non-trivial values in the imaginary parts of the array.

I'm at a total loss as to why this is. Are any of my assumptions incorrect
or has anyone had similar experiences?

Thanks in advance!

Sean
SeanOg wrote:

> Hi all, > > I was hoping someone could shed some light on this problem Im having. Ill > be as clear as possible. > > Im using the Java JNI wrapper for FFTW. The problem I am having is > regarding the imaginary components being returned from a real to complex > tranform. > > As I understand it, the format of the array returned by the FFTW real to > complex transform is (for an even N length signal); > > [dc][r1][r2][r3][r4][ny][i4][i3][i2][i1] > > where > dc = direct component > ny = nyquist > and > (rx, ix) are the various imaginary numbers > > If I input a pure cosine wave of fHz, I would assume that all the [ix] > elements of the array would be zero or close enough. However I'm getting > some non-trivial values in the imaginary parts of the array. > > I'm at a total loss as to why this is. Are any of my assumptions incorrect > or has anyone had similar experiences? > > Thanks in advance! > > Sean
An FFT of a totally real input signal will, in general, return results with nonzero real and imaginary parts. If the input signal has even symmetry around 0 then the FFT should be all real, if it has odd symmetry around 0 then the FFT should be all imaginary. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com Posting from Google? See http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/ "Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" came out in April. See details at http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html