Forums

DSPAUDIOEVMMB1E Troubles

Started by jag3...@Lehigh.EDU January 28, 2008
Hi all,

I'm working with this development board and the DSP56366 daughterboard for a senior project. This is my first time working with a DSP kit, and while I know I'm a beginner, I was expecting a lot more clarity and help in the what little documentation there is. I've obtained the passthru code from a helpful user on this forum already, and have the following software:

Symphony Studio
Suite56
Freescale SDI for DSP56xxx

However, none appear able to do anything in the way of actually programming the DSP board. I have the board set up communicating with my computer with the RS232 serial port on the board.

I am completely lost as of right now. The documentation tells me very little in terms of what I actually need to get working. Please, do not tell me I need the DSP Parallel Port Command Converter from Freescale. I've already sunk too much money into this kit.

How can I possibly program this chip??? Any help at all would be enormously appreciately.

- Jim
Hi Jim,

the DSPAUDIOEVMMB1E has the DSP Parallel Port Command Converter from Freescale integrated. You don't need to buy this additionally that way.

Please use the included parallel (not serial) cable to access the DSP OnCE interface. Please use the most recent Suite 56 software version - don't forget to start he command server first.

Unfortunately you don't describe your problems exactly enough to enable me to help you.

1.) Are you able you control the DSP by the software, i.e. run and stop the passthru code that has been preprogammed to the FLASH before shipping?

If not start here to get the tool chain running first. There is a thread where we discussed this item before, see: http://www.dsprelated.com/groups/motoroladsp/show/3536.php

Maybe some questions are answered here.

Don't give up

Christian
Jim,

A parallel port command converter is built into the EVM board, so there's nothing more to buy (assuming your PC still has a parallel port on it). The serial debugger will be useless to you as it's a debugger specific to working with the operating system within the DSP ROM which is unavailable to you without a license. Either Suite56 or Symphony Studio will allow you to connect via the parallel port and talk to the DSP. If you don't have a parallel port, then unfortunately you're going to need to get a USB command converter which is only supported by Symphony Studio. The passthru code should give you a good starting template to work with.

You probably don't want to hear this, but here is a much cheaper solution available to work with called the Symphony SoundBite. It's around $150 and has a built-in USB command converter. It's based on the 56371 which is a newer, higher performance DSP as well.

--
Mark

----- Original Message ----
From: "j...@Lehigh.EDU"
To: m...
Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2008 3:03:21 PM
Subject: [motoroladsp] DSPAUDIOEVMMB1E Troubles

Hi all,

I'm working with this development board and the DSP56366 daughterboard for a senior project. This is my first time working with a DSP kit, and while I know I'm a beginner, I was expecting a lot more clarity and help in the what little documentation there is. I've obtained the passthru code from a helpful user on this forum already, and have the following software:

Symphony Studio

Suite56

Freescale SDI for DSP56xxx

However, none appear able to do anything in the way of actually programming the DSP board. I have the board set up communicating with my computer with the RS232 serial port on the board.

I am completely lost as of right now. The documentation tells me very little in terms of what I actually need to get working. Please, do not tell me I need the DSP Parallel Port Command Converter from Freescale. I've already sunk too much money into this kit.

How can I possibly program this chip??? Any help at all would be enormously appreciately.

- Jim
Thanks to both of you. I'm able to talk to the chip now using Suite56, and I have the assembly passthru code which Christian sent me previously. At this point I'm really just trying to understand more about the chips capabilities, what different memory spaces mean, and what assembly instructions are applicable.

I'm currently taking a microprocessors course which covers the HCS12 series of microcontrollers. I would do anything for this DSP chip to have documentation as good as Freescale's microcontrollers.

Also - I really wish I knew that the Soundbite existed. It looks perfect, and it actually comes with examples, software and documentation!

Thanks again for the help though, guys. I'll keep trudging through.

- Jim

Hi all,
>
>I'm working with this development board and the DSP56366 daughterboard for a senior project. This is my first time working with a DSP kit, and while I know I'm a beginner, I was expecting a lot more clarity and help in the what little documentation there is. I've obtained the passthru code from a helpful user on this forum already, and have the following software:
>
>Symphony Studio
>Suite56
>Freescale SDI for DSP56xxx
>
>However, none appear able to do anything in the way of actually programming the DSP board. I have the board set up communicating with my computer with the RS232 serial port on the board.
>
>I am completely lost as of right now. The documentation tells me very little in terms of what I actually need to get working. Please, do not tell me I need the DSP Parallel Port Command Converter from Freescale. I've already sunk too much money into this kit.
>
>How can I possibly program this chip??? Any help at all would be enormously appreciately.
>
>- Jim
I'll chime in here.

Freescale/Motorola and TI both produced some really good(or at least useful) documentation during the early 1990's. While capabilities of the chips have improved/changed, I really have not seen anything I would consider earthshattering in audio DSP in the last 10 years. Like all of the microcontrollers, they've gotten faster and more powerful and to a certain degree more complex. People have better learned to use these tools, certain manufacturers have integrated useful features. Improvements in software tools. For awhile, the meat of the market was in motor control and modems, so TI in particular went after this market.

But the basic building blocks are still the same. And the basic principles are still applicable. You want to understand the principles as much of the commodity(i.e. digital filters, processing for things like digital workstations) is now done via FPGAs to cut costs.

The key differences between something like the HCS12 and the DSP5636x or DSP5637x are similar to that between the 68HC11 and the DSP5600x series.

The biggest difference is that once you go to separate memory spaces is that you can access all of them in one instruction,i.e. you can fetch opcodes, move data, update pointers, and store data in the same instruction cycle. This is called a Harvard architecture (vs. the VonNeumann or Princeton architecture which is on the HC11, 8080, and Z80 chips of yesterday, and loosely the basis for the 8086 and derivatives like the Pentium).

This allows you to accomplish more than if you only had one address and data bus and memory mapped I/O like in an HC11. I don't have much knowledge of the HCS12, so I'll refrain from commenting. I also don't have much direct knowledge of the DSP56300 series (hoping my sound bite ships when they say it will). Most of my direct experience was with the DSP56002EVM.

One of the key ways to learn is to get something like the graphic EQ application written for the DSP56001(I attached links below, but don't rely on them to be there forever). It was updated to the 56311EVM.

As a project, try modifying the graphic EQ code to work on your chip. You can start with the passthrough code and compare what the graphic eq does to what the passthrough example does.

If you don't have the specific hardware, just start out with memory locations that contain the values of the A/D converters and bypass the A/D code that pulls that from the pot. In the debugger, manually change those values.

Over time, you will learn what the code does. You will also learn alot by modifying code to work on multiple processors, as this may be an important componet of your first DSP job.
For much of the Old archive, try the following:

http://www.freescale.com/files/product/doc/APR2.pdf?fsrch=1

Graphic EQ note. I include this because this also implemented the UI via hardware(potentiometers and a A/D converter).

http://www.freescale.com/files/dsp/doc/app_note/AN2110.pdf?fsrch=1
The same updated for the 56311EVM (you may need to rework the code for your platform.

http://www.freescale.com/files/dsp/doc/app_note/APR39.pdf?fsrch=1
How to program the DSP56300 series filter processor. You will probably want to read APR7 for the theory behind it.

You can also look at harmony-central's DSP page.

http://www.harmony-central.com/Computer/Programming/#DSP
My experience is much of the excellent documentation the Motorola team produced is still on freescales's website, but you really have to wade between the 56800 series and the StarCore. Also much like APR7 is covered by the filter coprocessor.

Best Regards and don't forget to have some fun, as the best thing about audio DSP is you can listen to your results.

Glen Farrell
Oceanside, CA
Jim wrote:

Thanks to both of you. I'm able to talk to the chip now using Suite56, and I have the assembly passthru code which Christian sent me previously. At this point I'm really just trying to understand more about the chips capabilities, what different memory spaces mean, and what assembly instructions are applicable.

I'm currently taking a microprocessors course which covers the HCS12 series of microcontrollers. I would do anything for this DSP chip to have documentation as good as Freescale's microcontrollers.

Also - I really wish I knew that the Soundbite existed. It looks perfect, and it actually comes with examples, software and documentation!

Thanks again for the help though, guys. I'll keep trudging through.

- Jim

Hi all,
>
It exists. Mine arrived on my doorstep last night.
Best Regards,

Glen Farrell

Jim wrote:
Also - I really wish I knew that the Soundbite existed. It looks perfect, and it actually comes with examples, software and documentation!

Thanks again for the help though, guys. I'll keep trudging through.

- Jim

Hi all,
>