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Standard literature for Sonar Signal Processing

Started by Sebastian Doht August 22, 2009
Hello,

I am one of the more passive users of the group. Because of that I know 
some people here worked in the sonar field. I want to know what standard 
textbooks are there that someone should have taken a look at who works 
in that field?
( I have some experience in radar and lidar data processing so I am not 
  looking for some basic filter theory stuff but my background in 
acoustics is quite limited, since my studies were mostly focused on 
radio based measurement and communication systems)

Greetz,
Sebastian
On 22 Aug, 14:53, Sebastian Doht <seb_d...@lycos.com> wrote:
> Hello, > > I am one of the more passive users of the group. Because of that I know > some people here worked in the sonar field. I want to know what standard > textbooks are there that someone should have taken a look at who works > in that field? > ( I have some experience in radar and lidar data processing so I am not > &#2013266080; looking for some basic filter theory stuff but my background in > acoustics is quite limited, since my studies were mostly focused on > radio based measurement and communication systems)
It would be easier to come up with suggestions if you stated more clearly what kind of problems you work with. Fish mapping requires a different approach than producing bathymetry maps. For state-of-the-art *operational* work (as opposed to R&D and more speculative stuff), the texts to start with are Urick: Principles of underwater sound Waite: Sonar for practicing engineers Lurton: An Introduction to Underwater Acoustics Urick is the standard reference, and is needed for that purpose alone: Just about every text refers to it. Waite talks about the technical workings of the equipment and how measurements are influenced by the environment, while Lurton extends further into applications, about doing actual measuerments, making maps, surveying the sea floor etc. For the more specialist users, books like Nielsen: Sonar Signal Processing Burdic: Underwater Acoustic System Analysis might become relevant. Be cautious whenever you see the term 'model-based signal processing' as in Candy's book. These methods are quite popular in the community these days, but suffer from the not all that insignificant shortcomming that they have never been tested in double-blind experiments. Experiments at sea are extremely difficult at the best of times, so anybody who do one will bring in as many parties as possible to maximize the outcome. So no one who get the data are truly 'blind'; they know something about the area etc. Second, getting ground truth data is all but impossible, so no one have ever been able to reject a method based on experiments, since actually getting valid measurements is all but impossible. Since no one can come up with better methods, no one can reject proposed methods as 'do not work'. Rune
Thx Rune. Since I need to know more about the acoustic transmission 
channel and the acoustic front-end your list suffices to start with.
On 22 Aug, 20:51, Sebastian Doht <seb_d...@lycos.com> wrote:
> Thx Rune. Since I need to know more about the acoustic transmission > channel and the acoustic front-end your list suffices to start with.
If you want to know about acoustics, add Jensen & al: Computational Ocean Acoustics to your list. The emphasis is on how to make numerical simulators for acoustic transmission channels, but in order to do that, one needs to understand the physics of the medium. I know of no other text that covers this as comprehensively as this book. But again, be cautious: Jensen & al cover only what can be modeled by numerics. The stuff that make the real mess during sonar surveys (dynamic and unknown oceanography, waves, anything and everything that exist in the water) is not covered. Rune