Forums

Using TI DSK at home

Started by Oompah Loompah November 12, 2011
Hi All

I don't have a lot of experience handling electrostatically sensitive
equipment. I've recently purchased a TI DSK (C6713) but haven't plugged it
in yet. I was worried about the ESD and wanted to know what would be the
cheapest/easiest way of ensuring I don't cause any damage to the kit. Would
a wrist band suffice? 

Also, the leaflet in the kit says that it is intended for use in a
"laborotary environment", whereas I intend to use it at home. Has anyone
among you used a DSK at home, and what precautions would you suggest. 

Thanks

On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 15:32:05 -0600, "Oompah Loompah"
<frq.ser@n_o_s_p_a_m.googlemail.com> wrote:

>Hi All > >I don't have a lot of experience handling electrostatically sensitive >equipment. I've recently purchased a TI DSK (C6713) but haven't plugged it >in yet. I was worried about the ESD and wanted to know what would be the >cheapest/easiest way of ensuring I don't cause any damage to the kit. Would >a wrist band suffice? > >Also, the leaflet in the kit says that it is intended for use in a >"laborotary environment", whereas I intend to use it at home. Has anyone >among you used a DSK at home, and what precautions would you suggest. > >Thanks >
For the most part if you handle the board by the edges you'll minimize risk to the components. If you have a regular spot where you want to use it you can get a static mat at a good electronics shop and put it on that. A wrist band is probably overkill. Eric Jacobsen Anchor Hill Communications www.anchorhill.com
On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 15:32:05 -0600, "Oompah Loompah"
<frq.ser@n_o_s_p_a_m.googlemail.com> wrote:

>C6713
I have a few of the TI kits and they all appear pretty well self protected. I beleive the "Lab Environment" label relieves them of the paperwork involved in FCC compliance in a residential environment. I have th eZdsp Quick Start (C5535) kit and I am hopeful that I can learn from this point. There are a few fellows working with these boards a the AQRP Yahoo group. URL : groups.yahoo.com/group/AQRP/ The focus of the group is on low power amateur radio construction and operation. If you care to check it out you may need to register and search through the various posts. Registration is used to minimize the intrusion of the impolite outside elements. My own level in the dsp world is that I can usually spell it but I am struggling for a better understanding. John Ferrell (Amateur Radio Call Sign W8CCW) John Ferrell W8CCW
On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 15:32:05 -0600, Oompah Loompah wrote:

> Hi All > > I don't have a lot of experience handling electrostatically sensitive > equipment. I've recently purchased a TI DSK (C6713) but haven't plugged > it in yet. I was worried about the ESD and wanted to know what would be > the cheapest/easiest way of ensuring I don't cause any damage to the > kit. Would a wrist band suffice? > > Also, the leaflet in the kit says that it is intended for use in a > "laborotary environment", whereas I intend to use it at home. Has anyone > among you used a DSK at home, and what precautions would you suggest.
"Lab environment" = "don't bitch if your radio doesn't work, and don't leave it out for toddlers to chew on". IOW, if your wive-mate accidentally dumps it in the stew and you all end up mentally handicapped from heavy metal poisoning it ain't gonna be on TI's dime. You can get a small static mat and wrist band fairly cheap, if you're concerned -- they're sold by folks that sell tools for working on PCs. I'd recommend using one, having been to enough ESD classes that I sometimes find myself wandering around murmuring "Landru", and accosting passers by to find out if they are "of the body". But you can make your own decisions -- for now. -- Tim Wescott Control system and signal processing consulting www.wescottdesign.com
Thank you all very much for your help and suggestions. Given they are quite
cheap, I'll probably get both the mat and the wrist band. 

I'll also make sure our dinner tomorrow is not a DSK-curry.
On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 11:35:28 -0600, Tim <tim@seemywebsite.please>
wrote:

>On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 15:32:05 -0600, Oompah Loompah wrote: > >> Hi All >> >> I don't have a lot of experience handling electrostatically sensitive >> equipment. I've recently purchased a TI DSK (C6713) but haven't plugged >> it in yet. I was worried about the ESD and wanted to know what would be >> the cheapest/easiest way of ensuring I don't cause any damage to the >> kit. Would a wrist band suffice?
BTW, I have not got around to these devices yet but if it requires the big $$$ compiler to make them useful I will depart quickly. A "30 day free trial" compiler is of no use to me... John Ferrell W8CCW
don't worry about ESD at all in a home/amateur environment. There is a very
real danger that I'll knock over a coffee cup with the wristband...
On 11/15/2011 07:51 PM, John Ferrell wrote:
> BTW, I have not got around to these devices yet but if it requires the > big $$$ compiler to make them useful I will depart quickly. A "30 day > free trial" compiler is of no use to me...
The command line compiler running under linux is available for free for quite a while now. Perfectly fine for home/amateur projects.
On 11/16/2011 4:46 AM, mnentwig wrote:
> don't worry about ESD at all in a home/amateur environment. There is a very > real danger that I'll knock over a coffee cup with the wristband...
If you make a spark when reaching for a doorknob, you'll zap the board reaching for that. Unlikely. Jerry -- Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
On Wed, 16 Nov 2011 11:03:09 +0100, Nils wrote:

> On 11/15/2011 07:51 PM, John Ferrell wrote: >> BTW, I have not got around to these devices yet but if it requires the >> big $$$ compiler to make them useful I will depart quickly. A "30 day >> free trial" compiler is of no use to me... > > The command line compiler running under linux is available for free for > quite a while now. Perfectly fine for home/amateur projects.
That's good to know. I absolutely hate proprietary IDEs -- they never work as well as dedicated ones, it's not always clear which of the project files is the make file equivalent, and there's no consistent* build script language. So my usual mission when a project gets serious is to figure out how to run the command-line compiler independently of the IDE, preferably from within a makefile that's structured the way most of my other makefiles are structured. * Not even as consistent as all the versions of make -- www.wescottdesign.com