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RE: Which is the best DSP chip for audio processing ?

Started by Ebersman, Howard February 1, 2005
With respect to Motorola, the 568xx family is most cost effiect for 16 bit signal processing, while the 563xx is generally better for 24 bit processing.
 
The code generated for a family of processors is the generally same, except for the number and addresses of peripherals. I would code it up on one using an eval kit, and see how much RAM you need. Then, based on the price and selection of DSP processors (i.e. how much RAM, Flash), you can make the call of using internal or external RAM and Flash, and pick the part based on what you need. The peripheral set can be important, if you need to control or communicate with any special devices. Speed can be an issue too, although not as likely in your case.
 
Howard
-----Original Message-----
From: Jose [mailto:j...@yahoo.com.ar]
Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 11:22 AM
To: m...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [motoroladsp] Which is the best DSP chip for audio processing?


I want to develop an audio effects board, with at least 16-bit
resolution, and effects like delay, reverb, chorus.  Which can be a
cost-effective DSP chip for this kind of application?

Regards

Jose




I decided to use 24-bit processing, so I think I would use DSP56364
(price: u$s4.00). Also, I need to have at least 256Kwords of
external RAM because I am going to implement delay effects. I don't
know if a cheap PC memory could be used connected to the DSP. Have
any of you tried that?

Regards

Jose

--- In , "Ebersman, Howard"
<HEbersman@m...> wrote:
> With respect to Motorola, the 568xx family is most cost effiect
for 16 bit
> signal processing, while the 563xx is generally better for 24 bit
> processing.
>
> The code generated for a family of processors is the generally
same, except
> for the number and addresses of peripherals. I would code it up on
one using
> an eval kit, and see how much RAM you need. Then, based on the
price and
> selection of DSP processors (i.e. how much RAM, Flash), you can
make the
> call of using internal or external RAM and Flash, and pick the
part based on
> what you need. The peripheral set can be important, if you need to
control
> or communicate with any special devices. Speed can be an issue
too, although
> not as likely in your case.
>
> Howard
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jose [mailto:josecarlosfuentes@y...]
> Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 11:22 AM
> To:
> Subject: [motoroladsp] Which is the best DSP chip for audio
processing?
> I want to develop an audio effects board, with at least 16-bit
> resolution, and effects like delay, reverb, chorus. Which can be
a
> cost-effective DSP chip for this kind of application?
>
> Regards
>
> Jose



Cheap PC memory is usually DRAM or SDRAM, which requires a fair number of support ICs to do the refresh.  You may be able to find an integrated DRAM controller to help. At one time, a company called VIGRA did an audio DSP board that used DRAM for mass audio storage, but again, there were a lot of support ICs involved.  You might be able to find their information on a web site (they were bought out by a big miltary design house).  The circuit board number was something like MMI-105, MMI-210.
 
I would think that, in this day and age of cheap and very fast SRAM, that you ought to be able to buy cheap SRAM, which usually connects to Motorola DSPs easily.  I used to do this with Analog Devices DSPs in the late 90s when the price of a 32Kx8 SRAM dropped from around $3 to under a $1.

Jose <j...@yahoo.com.ar> wrote:


I decided to use 24-bit processing, so I think I would use DSP56364
(price: u$s4.00).  Also, I need to have at least 256Kwords of
external RAM because I am going to implement delay effects.  I don't
know if a cheap PC memory could be used connected to the DSP.  Have
any of you tried that?

Regards

Jose

--- In m...@yahoogroups.com, "Ebersman, Howard"
<HEbersman@m...> wrote:
> With respect to Motorola, the 568xx family is most cost effiect
for 16 bit
> signal processing, while the 563xx is generally better for 24 bit
> processing.

> The code generated for a family of processors is the generally
same, except
> for the number and addresses of peripherals. I would code it up on
one using
> an eval kit, and see how much RAM you need. Then, based on the
price and
> selection of DSP processors (i.e. how much RAM, Flash), you can
make the
> call of using internal or external RAM and Flash, and pick the
part based on
> what you need. The peripheral set can be important, if you need to
control
> or communicate with any special devices. Speed can be an issue
too, although
> not as likely in your case.

> Howard
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jose [mailto:josecarlosfuentes@y...]
> Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 11:22 AM
> To: m...@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [motoroladsp] Which is the best DSP chip for audio
processing?>
> I want to develop an audio effects board, with at least 16-bit
> resolution, and effects like delay, reverb, chorus.  Which can be
a
> cost-effective DSP chip for this kind of application?
>
> Regards
>
> Jose


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The 56364 has a DRAM controller on chip as well as SRAM support (as
does most of the 56300 family). However, keep in mind the 56364 only
has an 8-bit external data bus so some packing/unpacking may be
required for your application. Also note that the most internal PRAM
you can have is 1.25k. This may be plenty for your application but of
the 5636x family it's by far the smallest...

--
dB --- Kenneth Ciszewski <> wrote:

> Cheap PC memory is usually DRAM or SDRAM, which requires a fair
> number of support ICs to do the refresh. You may be able to find an
> integrated DRAM controller to help. At one time, a company called
> VIGRA did an audio DSP board that used DRAM for mass audio storage,
> but again, there were a lot of support ICs involved. You might be
> able to find their information on a web site (they were bought out by
> a big miltary design house). The circuit board number was something
> like MMI-105, MMI-210.
>
> I would think that, in this day and age of cheap and very fast SRAM,
> that you ought to be able to buy cheap SRAM, which usually connects
> to Motorola DSPs easily. I used to do this with Analog Devices DSPs
> in the late 90s when the price of a 32Kx8 SRAM dropped from around $3
> to under a $1.
>
> Jose <> wrote: > I decided to use 24-bit processing, so I think I would use DSP56364
> (price: u$s4.00). Also, I need to have at least 256Kwords of
> external RAM because I am going to implement delay effects. I don't
> know if a cheap PC memory could be used connected to the DSP. Have
> any of you tried that?
>
> Regards
>
> Jose
>
> --- In , "Ebersman, Howard"
> <HEbersman@m...> wrote:
> > With respect to Motorola, the 568xx family is most cost effiect
> for 16 bit
> > signal processing, while the 563xx is generally better for 24 bit
> > processing.
> >
> > The code generated for a family of processors is the generally
> same, except
> > for the number and addresses of peripherals. I would code it up on
> one using
> > an eval kit, and see how much RAM you need. Then, based on the
> price and
> > selection of DSP processors (i.e. how much RAM, Flash), you can
> make the
> > call of using internal or external RAM and Flash, and pick the
> part based on
> > what you need. The peripheral set can be important, if you need to
> control
> > or communicate with any special devices. Speed can be an issue
> too, although
> > not as likely in your case.
> >
> > Howard
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Jose [mailto:josecarlosfuentes@y...]
> > Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 11:22 AM
> > To:
> > Subject: [motoroladsp] Which is the best DSP chip for audio
> processing?
> >
> >
> >
> > I want to develop an audio effects board, with at least 16-bit
> > resolution, and effects like delay, reverb, chorus. Which can be
> a
> > cost-effective DSP chip for this kind of application?
> >
> > Regards
> >
> > Jose >
>
> To

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