Digital Signal Processing Maths

Markus Hoffmann
1 comment

Modern digital signal processing makes use of a variety of mathematical techniques. These techniques are used to design and understand efficient filters for data processing and control.


Auditory Component Analysis Using Perceptual Pattern Recognition to Identify and Extract Independent Components From an Auditory Scene

Jonathan Boley

The cocktail party effect, our ability to separate a sound source from a multitude of other sources, has been researched in detail over the past few decades, and many investigators have tried to model this on computers. Two of the major research areas currently being evaluated for the so-called sound source separation problem are Auditory Scene Analysis (Bregman 1990) and a class of statistical analysis techniques known as Independent Component Analysis (Hyvärinen 2001). This paper presents a methodology for combining these two techniques. It suggests a framework that first separates sounds by analyzing the incoming audio for patterns and synthesizing or filtering them accordingly, measures features of the resulting tracks, and finally separates sounds statistically by matching feature sets and making the output streams statistically independent. Artificial and acoustical mixes of sounds are used to evaluate the signal-to-noise ratio where the signal is the desired source and the noise is comprised of all other sources. The proposed system is found to successfully separate audio streams. The amount of separation is inversely proportional to the amount of reverberation present.


Fundamentals of the DFT (fft) Algorithms

D. Sundararajan

In this article, a physical explanation of the fundamentals of the DFT (fft) algorithms is presented in terms of waveform decomposition. After reading the article and trying the examples, the reader is expected to gain a clear understanding of the basics of the mysterious DFT (fft) algorithms.


Optimization of Synthesis Oversampled Complex Filter Banks

Gauthier, Jerome, Duval, Laurent

An important issue with oversampled FIR analysis filter banks (FBs) is to determine inverse synthesis FBs, when they exist. Given any complex oversampled FIR analysis FB, we first provide an algorithm to determine whether there exists an inverse FIR synthesis system. We also provide a method to ensure the Hermitian symmetry property on the synthesis side, which is serviceable to processing real-valued signals. As an invertible analysis scheme corresponds to a redundant decomposition, there is no unique inverse FB. Given a particular solution, we parameterize the whole family of inverses through a null space projection. The resulting reduced parameter set simplifies design procedures, since the perfect reconstruction constrained optimization problem is recast as an unconstrained optimization problem. The design of optimized synthesis FBs based on time or frequency localization criteria is then investigated, using a simple yet efficient gradient algorithm.


Hybrid Floating Point Technique Yields 1.2 Gigasample Per Second 32 to 2048 point Floating Point FFT in a single FPGA

Raymond J. Andraka

Hardware Digital Signal Processing, especially hardware targeted to FPGAs, has traditionally been done using fixed point arithmetic, mainly due to the high cost associated with implementing floating point arithmetic. That cost comes in the form of increased circuit complexity. The increase circuit complexity usually also degrades maximum clock performance. Certain applications demand the dynamic range offered by floating point hardware, and yet require the speeds and circuit density usually associated with fixed point hardware. The Fourier transform is one DSP building block that frequently requires floating point dynamic range. Textbook construction of a pipelined floating point FFT engine capable of continuous input entails dozens of floating point adders and multipliers. The complexity of those circuits quickly exceeds the resources available on a single FPGA. This paper describes a technique that is a hybrid of fixed point and floating point operations designed to significantly reduce the overhead for floating point. The results are illustrated with an FFT processor that performs 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024 and 2048 point Fourier transforms with IEEE single precision floating point inputs and outputs. The design achieves sufficient density to realize a continuous complex data rate of 1.2 Gigasamples per second data throughput using a single Virtex4-SX55-10 device.


Introduction to Digital Signal Processing

Paolo Prandoni
2 comments

Nice slides introducing Digital Signal Processing.


Efficient Digital Fiilters

Matthew Donadio
1 comment

What would you do in the following situation? Let ’ s say you are diagnosing a DSP system problem in the field. You have your trusty laptop with your development system and an emulator. You figure out that there was a problem with the system specifications and a symmetric FIR filter in the software won ’ t do the job; it needs reduced passband ripple, or maybe more stopband attenuation. You then realize you don ’ t have any filter design software on the laptop, and the customer is getting angry. The answer is easy: You can take the existing filter and sharpen it. Simply stated, filter sharpening is a technique for creating a new filter from an old one [1] – [3] . While the technique is almost 30 years old, it is not generally known by DSP engineers nor is it mentioned in most DSP textbooks.


An application of neural networks to adaptive playout delay in VoIP

Ying Zhang, Damien Fay

The statistical nature of data traffic and the dynamic routing techniques employed in IP networks results in a varying network delay (jitter) experienced by the individual IP packets which form a VoIP flow. As a result voice packets generated at successive and periodic intervals at a source will typically be buffered at the receiver prior to playback in order to smooth out the jitter. However, the additional delay introduced by the playout buffer degrades the quality of service. Thus, the ability to forecast the jitter is an integral part of selecting an appropriate buffer size. This paper compares several neural network based models for adaptive playout buffer selection and in particular a novel combined wavelet transform/neural network approach is proposed. The effectiveness of these algorithms is evaluated using recorded VoIP traces by comparing the buffering delay and the packet loss ratios for each technique. In addition, an output speech signal is reconstructed based on the packet loss information for each algorithm and the perceptual quality of the speech is then estimated using the PESQ MOS algorithm. Simulation results indicate that proposed Haar-Wavelets-Packet MLP and Statistical-Model MLP adaptive scheduling schemes offer superior performance.


HIERARCHICAL MOTION ESTIMATION FOR EMBEDDED OBJECT TRACKING

Michael McErlean

This paper presents an algorithm developed to provide automatic motion detection and object tracking embedded within intelligent CCTV systems. The algorithm development focuses on techniques which provide an efficient embedded systems implementation with the ability to target both FPGA and DSP devices. During algorithm development constraints on hardware implementation have been fully considered resulting in an algorithm which, when targeted at current FPGA devices, will take full advantage of the DSP resource commonly provided in such devices. The hierarchical structure of the proposed algorithm provides the system with a multi-level motion estimation process allowing low resolution estimation for motion detection and further higher resolution stages for motion estimation. An initial MATLAB prototype has demonstrated this algorithm capable of object motion estimation while compensating for camera motion, allowing a moving object to be tracked by a moving camera.


An FPGA Implementation of Hierarchical Motion Estimation for Embedded Oject Tracking

Michael McErlean

This paper presents the hardware implementation of an algorithm developed to provide automatic motion detection and object tracking functionality embedded within intelligent CCTV systems. The implementation is targeted at an Altera Stratix FPGA making full use of the dedicated DSP resource. The Altera Nios embedded processor provides a platform for the tracking control loop and generic Pan Tilt Zoom camera interface. This paper details the explicit functional stages of the algorithm that lend themselves to an optimised pipelined hardware implementation. This implementation provides maximum data throughput, providing real-time operation of the described algorithm, and enables a moving camera to track a moving object in real time.